Stevens-Johnson syndrome

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Stevens-Johnson syndrome

 [ste´venz jon´son]
a severe and sometimes fatal form of erythema multiforme in which the lesions may involve the oral and anogenital mucosa, eyes, and viscera, associated with such constitutional symptoms as malaise, headache, fever, arthralgia, and conjunctivitis.

Ste·vens-John·son syn·drome

(stē'vĕnz jon'sŏn),
a bullous form of erythema multiforme that may be extensive, involving the mucous membranes and large areas of the body; it may produce serious subjective symptoms and may have a fatal termination.
See also: ocular-mucous membrane syndrome.

Ste·vens-John·son syn·drome

(stē'vĕnz jon'sŏn),
a bullous form of erythema multiforme that may be extensive, involving the mucous membranes and large areas of the body; it may produce serious subjective symptoms and may have a fatal termination.
See also: ocular-mucous membrane syndrome.

Stevens-Johnson syndrome

(stē′vənz-jŏn′sən)
n.
A severe inflammatory eruption of the skin and mucous membranes, usually occurring after an infection, with malignancy, or as an allergic reaction to drugs or other substances.

Stevens-Johnson syndrome

Dermatology A variant of erythema multiforme characterized by purpuric macules or atypical targetoid lesions with focal confluence and epithelial detachment covering < 10% of body surface;12 are reactions to drugs–eg, sulfonamides, anticonvulsants, allopurinol, etc; 10-30% are accompanied by systemic Sx Clinical Fever, erosive stomatitis, lesions of anogenital mucosa, conjunctiva–keratitis, corneal erosions, RTIs; < 5% are fatal Treatment Delete offending drug

Ste·vens-John·son syn·drome

(stē'vĕnz jon'sŏn sin'drōm)
A bullous form of erythema multiforme that may be extensive, involving the mucous membranes and large areas of the body; it may produce serious subjective symptoms and may be fatal.

Stevens-Johnson syndrome

(ste'venz-jon'son)
[Albert M. Stevens, 1884–1945, Frank C. Johnson, 1894–1934, U.S. pediatricians]
Enlarge picture
STEVENS-JOHNSON SYNDROME
A systemic skin disease, probably identical to toxic epidermal necrolysis, that produces fevers and lesions of the oral, conjunctival, and vaginal mucous membranes. It is marked by a cutaneous rash that is often widespread and severe. Skin loss may lead to dehydration, infection, or death. See: illustration; erythema multiforme
illustration

Stevens-Johnson syndrome

A rare but severe condition involving skin and MUCOUS MEMBRANES of the eyes, mouth, nose and genitals and featuring ulceration and loss of epithelium with abnormal adhesions. A form of ERYTHEMA MULTIFORME usually caused by an adverse reaction to drugs such as the SULPHONAMIDES. (Albert Mason Stevens, 1884–1935, American paediatrician; and Frank Chambliss Johnson, 1894–1934, American paediatrician).

Stevens-Johnson syndrome

A severe form of erythema multiforme in which the systemic symptoms are severe and the lesions extensive, involving multiple body areas, especially the mucous membranes.

Baader,

Ernst, German physician.
Baader dermatostomatitis - Synonym(s): Stevens-Johnson syndrome

Johnson,

Frank Chambliss, U.S. pediatrician, 1894-1934.
Stevens-Johnson syndrome - see under Stevens, Albert Mason

Stevens,

Albert Mason, U.S. pediatrician, 1884-1945.
Stevens-Johnson syndrome - a bullous form of erythema multiforme. Synonym(s): Baader dermatostomatitis; ectodermosis erosiva pluriorificialis; erythema multiforme bullosum; erythema multiforme exudativum; erythema multiforme major

Ste·vens-John·son syn·drome

(stē'vĕnz jon'sŏn sin'drōm)
A bullous form of erythema multiforme that may be extensive, involving the mucous membranes and large areas of the body.
References in periodicals archive ?
Clinical characteristics and treatment outcome of steven-johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis.
Dr Aomesh Bhatt, UK Medical Director of Reckitt Benckiser, one of the firms which makes ibuprofen pills, wrote to Donnette saying: "The incidence of Steven-Johnson Syndrome is one case per 100 million packs sold.
He was suffering from the extremely rare Steven-Johnson Syndrome (SJS) - which is believed to have been sparked by taking the over-the-counter drug ibuprofen.
Steven-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and/or toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are uncommon diseases with an incidence about 1.9 cases per million per year [1].
Steven-Johnson Syndrome (SJS) is an infrequent but a severe form of adverse hypersensitivity reaction to drugs which results in skin and mucosal eruptions that can be potentially lethal.