sternocleidomastoid

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sternocleidomastoid

 [ster″no-kli″do-mas´toid]
pertaining to the sternum, clavicle, and mastoid process.

ster·no·clei·do·mas·toid

(ster'nō-klī'dō-mas'toyd),
Relating to sternum, clavicle, and mastoid process.

sternocleidomastoid

/ster·no·clei·do·mas·toid/ (-kli″do-mas´toid) pertaining to the sternum, clavicle, and mastoid process.

sternocleidomastoid

(stûr′nō-klī′də-măs′toid)
n.
Either of two muscles of the neck that serve to flex the neck and rotate the head.

sternocleidomastoid

[-klī′dōmas′toid]
Etymology: Gk, sternon, chest, kleis, key, mastos, breast, eidos, form
a muscle of the neck that is attached to the mastoid process of the temporal bone and to the superior nuchal line and by separate heads to the sternum and clavicle. They function together to flex the head. Also called sternomastoid.

ster·no·clei·do·mas·toid

(stĕr'nō-klī'dō-mas'toyd)
Relating to sternum, clavicle, and mastoid process.

ster·no·clei·do·mas·toid

(stĕr'nō-klī'dō-mas'toyd)
Relating to sternum, clavicle, and mastoid process.
References in periodicals archive ?
A rare case of bilateral sternocleidomastoid muscle variation.
Variation in the origin of sternocleidomastoid muscle.
Sternocleidomastoid muscle contraction was encouraged in all subjects.
The purpose of our study was to determine the reliability and specificity of VEMP vis a vis 4 variables: primary waveform (P13 and N23), type of stimulus (500-Hz tone and click), sternocleidomastoid muscle contraction monitoring (with and without), and the timing of the testing session (initial test and retest).
The consensus in the literature is that sternocleidomastoid muscle stimulation has a positive impact on VEMP amplitude stability.
The sternocleidomastoid muscle receives its blood supply from branches of the occipital and posterior auricular arteries, which supply the upper part of the muscle.
The sternocleidomastoid muscle acting alone, laterally flexes the neck and rotates the face to the opposite side.
Spasm of the sternocleidomastoid muscle, usually of unknown origin but sometimes congenital, is one cause of a flexion deformity of the neck known wryneck or torticollis; other muscles that rotate and flex the neck also may contribute to torticollis (Williams et al.
The sternocleidomastoid muscle varies much in the extent of its origin from the clavicle.
In a routine dissection, under a surgical microscope, it was observed in a nine months old baby, a clavicular arrangement of the insertion of the sternocleidomastoid muscle.
The sternocleidomastoid muscle after gross dissection showed morphologic variation.
Comparative anatomical studies related the Man had concluded that the sternocleidomastoid muscle is formed by five portions arranged in two layers.

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