sternocleidomastoid

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sternocleidomastoid

 [ster″no-kli″do-mas´toid]
pertaining to the sternum, clavicle, and mastoid process.

ster·no·clei·do·mas·toid

(ster'nō-klī'dō-mas'toyd),
Relating to sternum, clavicle, and mastoid process.

sternocleidomastoid

(stûr′nō-klī′də-măs′toid)
n.
Either of two muscles of the neck that serve to flex the neck and rotate the head.

ster·no·clei·do·mas·toid

(stĕr'nō-klī'dō-mas'toyd)
Relating to sternum, clavicle, and mastoid process.

ster·no·clei·do·mas·toid

(stĕr'nō-klī'dō-mas'toyd)
Relating to sternum, clavicle, and mastoid process.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mustafa (2006) has reported a supernumerary cleidooccipital muscle, more or less separate from the sternocleidomastoid muscle. This cliedo-occipital muscle exists in 33% of cases.
The knowledge of variations of sternocleidomastoid muscle is important for head and neck surgeons.
A rare case of bilateral sternocleidomastoid muscle variation.
Sternocleidomastoid muscle contraction was encouraged in all subjects.
Likewise, there were no significant differences in P13 values across all tests vis a vis the type of stimulus (p = 0.32) and the presence or absence of sternocleidomastoid muscle contraction monitoring (p = 0.60).
The consensus in the literature is that sternocleidomastoid muscle stimulation has a positive impact on VEMP amplitude stability.
The sternocleidomastoid muscle is supplied by the spinal part of the accessory nerve.
The sternocleidomastoid muscle receives its blood supply from branches of the occipital and posterior auricular arteries, which supply the upper part of the muscle.
The sternocleidomastoid muscle acting alone, laterally flexes the neck and rotates the face to the opposite side.
The sternocleidomastoid muscle is responsible for the mechanical action in the majority of the head movements, is algo considered an accessory muscle for respiration (Costa et al., 1994).
In a routine dissection, under a surgical microscope, it was observed in a nine months old baby, a clavicular arrangement of the insertion of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. The skin, the platisma muscle (Fig.
The sternocleidomastoid muscle after gross dissection showed morphologic variation.

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