steroid

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Related to Steriod: Steroid hormones

steroid

 [ster´oid]
any of a group of lipids with a complex molecule containing carbon atoms in four interlocking rings forming a hydrogenated cyclopentophenanthrene-ring system; three of the rings contain six carbon atoms each and the fourth contains five. Steroids are important in body chemistry and include steroid hormones such as the gonadal or sex steroids, corticosteroids, glucocorticoids, and mineralocorticoids; vitamins of the D group; and the sterols, including cholesterol, the main building block of the steroid hormones in the body. The cardiac glycosides, a group of compounds derived from certain plants, are partly steroids.
anabolic steroid any of a group of synthetic derivatives of testosterone having pronounced anabolic properties and relatively weak androgenic properties; they are used clinically mainly to promote growth and repair of body tissues in diseases or states promoting catabolism or tissue wasting.
gonadal steroid (sex steroid) a steroid hormone produced by a gonad, such as an androgen, estrogen, or progestational agent.

ster·oid

(stēr'oyd, ster'oyd), Avoid using the simple word steroid in a special sense, such as adrenal corticosteroid (or corticoid) or anabolic steroid, unless the meaning is clear from the context.
1. Pertaining to the steroids. Synonym(s): steroidal Compare: steroids.
2. One of the steroids (for example, sterols, bile acids, cardiac glycosides, androgens, estrogens, corticosteroids, precursors of the D vitamins). Synonym(s): sterid
3. Generic designation for compounds closely related in structure to the steroids, such as sterols, bile acids, cardiac glycosides, androgens, estrogens, corticosteroids, and precursors of the D vitamins.
[G. stereos, solid; solid lipids vs oils]

steroid

/ster·oid/ (ster´oid) any of a group of lipids with a specific 7-carbon-atom ring system as a nucleus, such as progesterone, adrenocortical and gonadal hormones, bile acids, sterols, toad poisons, and some carcinogenic hydrocarbons.steroi´dal
anabolic steroid  any of a group of synthetic derivatives of testosterone having pronounced anabolic properties and relatively weak androgenic properties; they are used clinically mainly to promote growth and repair of body tissues in diseases or states promoting catabolism or tissue wasting.

steroid

(stĕr′oid′, stîr′-)
n.
1. Any of numerous fat-soluble organic compounds that have a core structure of 17 carbon atoms arranged in four rings, found naturally in animals, plants, and fungi, or produced synthetically. Steroids include the sterols (such as cholesterol), sex hormones (such as estrogen and testosterone), corticosteroid hormones (such as cortisol), bile acids, and anabolic steroids.
2. Informal An anabolic steroid.

ste′roid′, ste·roi′dal (stĕ-roid′l, stĭ-) adj.

steroid

[stir′oid]
Etymology: Gk, stereos + eidos, form
any of a large number of hormonal substances with a similar basic chemical structure, produced mainly in the adrenal cortex and gonads. Steroids are chemically related to sterols.

steroid

  adjective Pertaining to steroid hormones noun
1. A cholesterol-derived lipid that is the parent compound for steroid hormones of the adrenal gland and gonads.
2. Steroid hormone A hormone produced from modified cholesterol Examples Hormones from testis, ovary, adrenal cortex, etc Uses Relief of swelling, inflammation. See Anabolic steroid, Corticosteroid, Glucocorticosteroid, Ketogenic steroid. Cf Peptide hormone.
3. Any compound–eg, bile acids, cardiac glycosides, vitamin D precursors, that is struturally similar–ie, has a cyclopentaphenanthrene core–to steroid hormones.

ster·oid

(ster'oyd)
1. Pertaining to the steroids.
Synonym(s): steroidal.
2. Generic designation for compounds closely related in structure to the steroids, such as sterols, bile acids, cardiac glycosides, and precursors of the D vitamins.
Compare: bioregulator
Compare: steroids
[G. stereos, solid; solid lipids vs. oils]

steroid

1. Sterol-like.
2. Any member of the class of fat-soluble organic compounds based on a structure of 17 carbon atoms arranged in three connected rings of six, six and five carbons. The steroids include the adrenal cortex hormones, the SEX HORMONES, PROGESTOGENS, BILE SALTS, STEROLS and a wide range of synthetic compounds produced for therapeutic purposes. Anabolic steroids are male sex hormones that stimulate the production of protein.

steroid

an important but unusual type of LIPID, formed of four rings of carbon atoms with various side groups, such as cholesterol, digitoxin (which forms part of the heart-stimulating drug digitalis) and cortisone.

Steroid

A natural body substance that often is given to women before delivering a very premature infant to stimulate the fetal lungs to produce surfactant, hopefully preventing RDS (or making it less severe).

steroid 

One of a group of hormonal substances produced mainly by the adrenal cortex. They fall into three main groups: glucocorticoids (or glucocorticosteroids), mineralocorticoids and sex hormones. The glucocorticoids have antiinflammatory properties reducing vasodilatation, stabilizing mast cells thus decreasing the release of histamine and maintaining the normal permeability of blood thus preventing oedema. They also inhibit the production of prostaglandins, which mediate some of the effects of inflammation. They are widely used in the treatment of a variety of inflammatory diseases of various organs including the eye (e.g. allergic and vernal conjunctivitis, corneal diseases, iritis, uveitis and sympathetic ophthalmia). The natural glucocorticoids, such as cortisone and hydrocortisone, are effective only at high doses. Synthetic and more potent steroids are used in ophthalmic treatment (when used as ophthalmic preparations they are called corticosteroids). They include, betamethasone, dexamethasone, fluorometholone, prednisolone and triamcinolone. See antiinflammatory drug.

ster·oid

(ster'oyd)
1. Pertaining to the steroids.
2. One of the steroids (e.g., sterols, bile acids, cardiac glycosides, androgens, estrogens, corticosteroids, precursors of the D vitamins).
[G. stereos, solid; solid lipids vs. oils]

steroid (ster´oid),

n a group name for compounds that resemble cholesterol chemically and also contain a hydrogenated cyclopentanoperhydrophenanthrene ring system. Included are cholesterol, ergosterol, bile acids, vitamin D, sex hormones, adrenocortical hormones, and cardiac glycosides.
steroid, 11-oxy,
n the C-21 corticosteroids, all of which are oxygenated at carbon 11.
steroid, 17 α-hydroxycortico- (17-OHCS),
n term used for cortisol and other 21-carbon steroids possessing a dihydroxyacetone group at carbon 17. Serum and urinary determinations give a direct measurement of adrenocortical activity.
steroid, 17-keto- (17-KS),
n steroidal compounds with a ketone (carbonyl) group at carbon 17. Derived from cortisol and adrenal and testicular androgen. Urinary neutral 17-ketosteroids represent the catabolic end products of the endocrine glands. Produced by the adrenal cortex and testes. Increased values occur in adrenogenital syndromes, adrenocortical carcinoma, bilateral hyperplasia of the adrenal cortex, and Leydig cell tumors. Normal adult values for a 24-hour urine sample are 10 to 20 mg for men and 5 to 15 mg for women.
steroid, adrenocortical (adrenal corticosteroid),
n 1. a hormone extracted from the adrenal cortex or a synthetic substance similar in chemical structure and biologic activity to such a hormone.
2. the biologically active steroid of the adrenal cortex, which include 11-dehydrocorticosterone (compound A), corticosterone (compound B), cortisone (compound E), 17 α-hydroxycorticosterone (compound F, hydroxycortisone, or cortisol), and aldosterone. The effects of the corticosteroids include increased resorption of sodium and chloride by the renal tubules and metabolic effects on protein, carbohydrate, and fat.
steroid, C-19 cortico- (anabolic protein, N hormone),
n adrenocortical hormones similar in action to the male and female sex hormones. They cause nitrogen retention and, in excessive amounts, masculinization in the female.
steroid, C-21 cortico- (glycogenic steroid, sugar hormone),
n 21-carbon adrenocortical hormones that are oxygenated at carbon 11 or at both carbon 11 and 17. They affect protein, carbohydrate, and fat metabolism; e.g., they elevate blood sugar, increase glyconeogenesis, decrease hepatic lipogenesis, mobilize depot fat, and increase protein metabolism.
steroid, glycogenic,
n See steroid, C-21 cortico-.

steroid

a complex molecule containing carbon atoms in four interlocking rings forming a hydrogenated cyclopentophenanthrene-ring system; three of the rings contain six carbon atoms each and the fourth contains five.
Steroid derivatives are important in body chemistry. Among them are the male and female sex hormones, such as testosterone and estrogen, and the hormones of the cortices of the adrenal glands, including cortisone. Vitamins of the D group are steroids involved in calcium metabolism. The cardiac glycosides, a group of compounds derived from certain plants, are partly steroids. Sterols, including cholesterol, are steroids. Cholesterol is the main building block of steroid hormones in the body; it is also converted into bile salts by the liver.

steroid I
alfaxalone.
steroid II
alfadolone.
steroid diabetes
see steroid diabetes mellitus.

Patient discussion about steroid

Q. Does steroids make children shorter? My 10 years-old son has asthma, and is treated with a steroid inhaler. Will this treatment cause him to be shorter in the future?

A. I don't think so. My cousin had asthma very badly when he was young, and he grew up to be tall, strong and healthy, thank goodness. Sometimes one does outgrow this, sometimes now, but as far as growth goes, I don't think it will stump growth.

Q. what sort of diet should I take to tone up my muscle and to lose fat in my body? Is steroid a good idea?

A. as williams41 say- it's a BAD idea... steroids wil damage your body immune system and can get you more prone to bacterial/virus/fungal attacks. it also have unhealthy side effects that one of them is distribution of fat in the face area that can be unpleasant. so consider your steps...

Q. Had FMS for almost twenty years now, tried almost everything. Is Lyrica in the "steroid" family? Any one in this community could help me? I have given my few questions to find out an answer. I Had FMS for almost twenty years now, tried almost everything. I'm considering Lyrica but I'd like more info. Is Lyrica in the "steroid" family? If you go on Lyrica for a while & see no improvement with pain, is going off of it a big deal like with other med's, or can you simply just stop taking it? I take Ambien, will that have any interactions? I'm seeing my Doc about this at the end of the month, but I was hoping to get some personal experiences about it. Thanks for any thoughts! Thanks for your answers, keep them coming!

A. according to this-
http://www.drugs.com/drug_interactions.php
there is a moderate interaction. that means you can take them both but be checked regularly for depression of breath.

More discussions about steroid
References in periodicals archive ?
Reilly's deceitful goodwill gesture toward Chicago Cubs slugger Sammy Sosa - handing him the address of a medical center that could test him for steriods, resulting in a obscenity- laced response from Sosa - started a firework chain-reaction debate in the media this week.
The battle against drugs in sport cannot be won but the use of performance enhancers like anabolic steriods, amphetamines, human growth hormone and drugs like EPO, which increase the amount of oxygen the blood can transport so improving efficiency by up to 30 per cent, can be limited by improved detection methods and strong punishment.
The sixth patient had improved but still needed steriod therapy to control colitis symptoms, the researchers report.
Steriods (eg dexamethasone, fluticasone propionate, prednisolone) as Norvir may raise the blood levels of these medicines which may lead to Cushing's syndrome (development of a rounded face) and reduce production of the hormone cortisol.
The latest chapter in Johnson's extraordinary career will soon see him charged with administering anabolic steriods to three horses and with running a horse, Striking Article, whose nerves had been severed below the knee.
represented by smuggling steriods from Southeast Asian countries.
By stabilizing a broad index of prices such a system should provide much more price level stability than a monometallic or bimetallic system; indeed this aspect represents an extended version of Alfred Marshall's (1887) "symmetallism" or Friedman's (1951) "commodity reserve currency"--that is, what one might refer to as "symmetallism on steriods.
Janeczak is using an inhaler and taking steriods, but the only way she's going to regain her confidence - and dominance - is to perform on the track.
Moreover, even if some "fix" of the sample or estimation procedure were to lead to a proper statistical test that could not reject some subset of the data from following a power law, none of DeVany's other inferences about steriods, and so forth would be warranted.
Speaking about the effect of steroids, one Belfast GP said: "Steroids exist in the body in small amounts without which the body would not work but when you take artificial steriods for muscle building you just screw the whole body up.
This practise led to women, who did not give birth in this time frame, receiving repeated treatment with many mothers receiving multiple courses of steriods between the 1990s and early 2000s.
He was confused and struggled to speak and was put on a course of steriods.