stereoscopy

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ster·e·os·co·py

(ster'ē-os'kŏ-pē),
1. An optic technique by which two images of the same object are blended into one, giving a three-dimensional appearance to the single image.
2.

stereoscopy

(stĕr′ē-ŏs′kə-pē, stîr′-)
n.
An optical technique by which two images of the same object are blended into one, giving a three-dimensional appearance to the single image.

ster·e·os·co·py

(ster'ē-os'kŏ-pē)
An optic technique by which two images of the same object are blended into one, giving a three-dimensional appearance to the single image.

stereoscopy 

The science dealing with the perception of three-dimensional effects and of producing them. See stereopsis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kodak's Stereoscopic Imaging Display system maintains full image resolution and creates a very wide field of view.
Kodak's Stereoscopic Imaging Display system also has a unique viewing zone, which makes it easy to see the "sweet spot" of an image while maintaining image quality across the entire viewing zone.
the world leader in 3D stereoscopic imaging products, today introduced the VR-4200, the world's first and only portable 3D stereoscopic projector to use single chip DLP(TM) (Digital Light Processing) technology made by Texas Instruments.
This 3D comedy/science-fiction series utilizes newly developed proprietary inter-media compositing techniques resulting in breakthrough 3D stereoscopic imaging.
A long-standing proponent of stereoscopic imaging, HP designed this functionality into its high-performance VISUALIZE workstations from the very beginning.
RVR has been determined to be extremely cost-effective for use in the production of 3-D images for motion picture special effects, graphics for electronic commerce on the Internet, "new media" virtual reality environments and additional stereoscopic imaging applications.
RVR has been determined to have time- and cost-savings applications for the production of 3-D images for motion-picture special effects, graphics for electronic commerce on the Internet, ``new-media'' virtual-reality environments and additional stereoscopic imaging applications.

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