stele


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stele

(stē′lē, stēl)
n.
1. also stela (stē′lə)pl. steles also ste·lae (-lē) An upright stone or slab with an inscribed or sculptured surface, used as a monument or as a commemorative tablet in the face of a building.
2. stele (stēl, stē′lē) The primary vascular tissue in the stem or root of a vascular plant, consisting of the xylem and phloem together with supporting tissues, such as pith.

ste′lar (-lər) adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
The original Buddhagupta Stele is currently housed at the Indian Museum in Kolkata.
During a visit to the Mesha Centre for Studies and Human Rights in Madaba, south of Amman, Dumas said returning Mesha Stele to Jordan "can only be resolved within international agreements of which Jordan and France are signatories.
A hattigala (elephant copulation with human) stele of unknown date is kept in the premises of Amruteshvara temple in Ratanwadi, at the base of Ratangad (the historic fort captured by Shivaji, around 150 km from Mumbai).
Arif "a tenu a honorer des soldats inhumes sur ce site qui, pour la plupart, perirent au cours de l'operation +Torch+ en novembre 1942, prelude a la constitution de l'armee de l'Afrique dont la contribution a la liberation de la France fut decisive", est-il ecrit sur la stele.
He begins by setting the context in Isaiah 13-23, particularly reconstructing the broken stele of YHWH.
While the proportions of the vertical 'planes' of each stele and of each of the negatives do pleasingly echo the proportions rendered in Leonardo da Vinci's Atlas and while it would be a mistake to avoid all reference to human perceptual scale in pursuit of my aesthetic, the stelae are not figural per se even as their construction from clay ties them to multiple mythological traditions that cite clay as the stuff of 'Creation'.
The anthropomorphic stele at Monte dos Zebros (Idanha-a-Nova): Contextualization amongst other Diadem-Steles in the Iberian Peninsula
Cole follows other Chan scholars in tracing the roots of Chan genealogy to a funerary stele for Faru (d.
stories: on the stele they press on up towards the great breast of the
Curator Gary Garrels discusses the different ways in which Ellsworth Kelly's "Stele I" marks the passage of time.
This stele commemorates the pharaoh Merneptah, the son and successor of Ramses II.
The stone, part of a stele, had on it three languages: Greek, 'demotic' or Egyptian and Egyptian hieroglyphics, a secret language used only by the priesthood.