stearic acid

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Related to Stearic acids: stearate, octadecanoic acid

stearic acid

 [ste-ar´ik]
a saturated fatty acid from animal and vegetable fats, used as a tablet and capsule lubricant and as an emulsifying and solubilizing agent.

ste·ar·ic ac·id

(stē'ă-rik as'id),
A saturated 18-carbon fatty acid, one of the most abundant found in animal lipids; used in pharmaceutical preparations, ointments, soaps, and suppositories.

stearic acid

n.
A colorless, odorless, waxlike, saturated fatty acid, C18H36O2, occurring in natural animal and vegetable fats and used in making soaps, candles, lubricants, and other products.

ste·ar·ic ac·id

(stē'ă-rik as'id)
One of the most abundant acids found in animal lipids; used in pharmaceutical preparations, ointments, soaps, and suppositories.

stearic acid

a saturated fatty acid having 18 carbon atoms, which occurs in animal fat.
References in periodicals archive ?
Figure 2 illustrates biological molecules that were analyzed: lipids such as palmitic acid and stearic acid, quercetin which is a flavonoid, and glucose a sugar.
Interaction between biological molecules (quercetin, glucose, palmitic acid, and stearic acid) and the three silver clusters previously optimized was simulated.
For surface modification, the granular type Stearic Acid obtained from Sigma Aldrich (Mol.
First, surface modification of silica nanoparticles was performed using stearic acid as non reactive modifier.
percentage of oil content protein content oleic acid linoleic acid palmitic acid stearic acid saturated and unsaturated fatty acids.
Stearic acid: For stearic acid the parental cultivars were 2.97 to 10.26% while in F3 populations the range was 2.90 to 10.39% (Table 4).
On the other hand, limited genetic studies have been conducted on stearic acid. Graef et al.
M25 is a very high stearic acid selection from the Ma generation of the irradiated cultivar Bay.
RS2, as with RS1, was alternately planted in the greenhouse and field, self-pollinated, and screened for both low palmitic and stearic acid content through the B[C.sub.1][F.sub.8] generation.
(1997) reported that there were lines with elevated stearic acid contents that were not significantly different in seed yield than the highest yielding line in the population.
Palmitic acid (46.75 %), linoleic acid (37.80 %) and stearic acid (10.98 %) were the major components.
After oleic acid, stearic acid, palmitic acid and linolaidic acid contents were followed as 8.630%, 6.040% and 1.540%, respectively.