statute of limitations

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statute of limitations

Malpractice A doctrine that allows a plaintiff 2 to 3 yrs–depending upon the state in the US, from the time of the alleged malpractice or negligence–by a physician or hospital–to file a lawsuit. See Emancipated minor, Malpractice.
References in periodicals archive ?
[section]95.051, which appears to be the only Florida statutory provision that provides for tolling or suspending of the legislatively mandated statutes of limitations. Notably, a statute of limitations is a procedural statute that prevents the enforcement of a cause of action that has accrued.
Suspension of Statutes of Limitation by Unilateral Administrative Action
Finally, statutes of limitations are designed to provide certainty and finality to litigation, (118) a goal that would be undermined by a strictly literal interpretation of [section] 42.56.550(6).
Statutes of limitations, also known as statutory time limits, are defined as the enforcement period for a claim through legal proceedings.
Statutes of limitations benefit society as well as the accused.
260, [section] 7 (2006) (allowing statute of limitations tolled where plaintiff was minor child); Developments in the Law Statutes of Limitations, 63 HARV.
Courts have split as to whether the doctrine has survived the abrogation of sovereign immunity, (54) whether it applies to municipalities in addition to state governments, (55) whether it applies to statutes of repose in addition to statutes of limitation, (56) and whether the government may bring suit in a proprietary role.
Statutes of limitations are legislatively or judicially created laws that limit the time during which a prosecution can be commenced.
Numerous courts have concluded that arbitrations are not "actions." Some of these cases have been decided within the context of issues related to statutes of limitation, whereas some cases have been decided in other contexts.
At issue was a California law that allowed the prosecution of child molesters and other sex offenders after the statutes of limitations in effect when they were charged had expired.
657, 672 (1913) ("The policy of statutes of limitation is to encourage promptness in the bringing of actions, that the parties shall not suffer by loss of evidence from death or disappearance of witnesses, destruction of documents or failure of memory.").
No specific references to statutes of limitation are made within the new statute itself.