statute of limitations

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statute of limitations

Malpractice A doctrine that allows a plaintiff 2 to 3 yrs–depending upon the state in the US, from the time of the alleged malpractice or negligence–by a physician or hospital–to file a lawsuit. See Emancipated minor, Malpractice.
References in periodicals archive ?
Inspection of the 2007 through 2010 returns reveals the same types of expense accounts; however, the years 2007, 2008, and 2009 are closed by the statute of limitation. The agent requests supporting documentation from 2007 through 2009 to substantiate the NOL carryforward for those years that would be brought into the open years.
(15) The court addressed three main issues: (1) the date on which the statute of limitations began to run; (2) whether an exception applied; and (3) whether the Children's derivative claim could survive after the underlying claim was dismissed as untimely.
Moreover, in the event a federal change creates a state tax refund for a taxpayer, the statute of limitations for reporting the federal change, rather than the standard limitation period, should apply to claim that refund.
Even in a state where there is a statute of limitations applicable to a regulatory board action, there will likely be exceptions that allow licensing board action for a specified period of time or for an unlimited period of time.
(4) In Murray, a personal injury complaint was filed a day before the statute of limitations was set to expire.
Texas and Washington state passed legislation this year making it more difficult to revive debt past its statute of limitations, but the industry successfully fought efforts in other states, including New York.
There is no statute of limitations on criminal charges in child sex abuse cases, but survivors and victims' advocates say civil lawsuits can often be the only way to get justice.
But because Section 15-1 establishes a two-year statute of limitations for misdemeanors, Curtis argued that her charges must be dismissed instead.
"The statute of limitations for fraud is the greater of six years from the date the cause of action accrued and two years from the time that plaintiff discovered or could have discovered the fraud with reasonable diligence," wrote Borrok in the decision.
In opposition to the motion, plaintiff maintained that the six-year statute of limitations controls this case.
"Everyone except for Janish Bakiyev were acquitted referring to the expiration of the statute of limitations. But the acquitted statute of limitations will expire in March 2019.