statute

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statute

Any law enacted by a state legislature.
References in periodicals archive ?
1895) (considering statute of frauds procedural and governed by forum law).
From the earliest email cases, the courts have not hesitated to find that email communications may comply with the Statute of Frauds.
The first of these exceptions to the Statute of Frauds is illustrated in Case Example 4-4.
Electronic contracts provide an opportunity to revisit the Statute of Frauds to determine its modern vitality.
90) The Court held the statute to be a virtual statute of frauds and noted that it was "manifest that there is no class of cases in which a statute for preventing frauds and perjuries is more needed than in this.
If the name of the signing party is only typed at the bottom of the communication is the contract signed for the purposes of the Statute of Frauds or the Sale of Goods Acts?
Even where the elements of a writing and signature are not both satisfied, the UCC provides that the statute of frauds is nonetheless deemed satisfied under the following four circumstances:
More precisely, if the effectiveness of such extralegal enforcement methods does not depend upon the existence of a writing such as that required by the Statute of Frauds, then one would expect that when the parties rely primarily on extralegal enforcement they will not meet the writing requirement of the Statute of Frauds.
74) By comparison, the statute of frauds demands a signed writing for contracts covering real property.
2003) (explaining that emails are sufficient writings under the Maine statute of frauds in part because "Maine common law has long recognized that a binding signature may take the form of any mark or designation thought proper by the party to be bound 'provided he intends to bind himself.
This casebook introducing the law of contracts to first-year law students opts for breadth of coverage over depth, sacrificing detailed analysis of certain subjects, but refusing to throw out important subjects such as the Statute of Frauds or third-party interest in contracts while still maintaining a reasonable length for a four-hour course as well as a relatively full presentation of judicial opinions.