station

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station

 [sta´shun]
the location of the presenting part of the fetus in the birth canal, designated as −5 to −1 according to the number of centimeters the part is above an imaginary plane passing through the ischial spines, 0 when at the plane, and +1 to +5 according to the number of centimeters the part is below the plane.
Station of the fetus. From McKinney et al. 2000.

sta·tion

(stā'shŭn),
The degree of descent of the presenting part of the fetus through the maternal pelvis, as measured in relation to the ischial spines of the maternal pelvis.

station

/sta·tion/ (sta´shun)
1. a position or location.
2. the location of the presenting part of the fetus in the birth canal, designated as −5 to −1 according to the number of centimeters the part is above an imaginary plane passing through the ischial spines, 0 when at the plane, and +1 to +5 according to the number of centimeters the part is below the plane.

station

[stā′shən]
Etymology: L, stare, to stand
the level of the biparietal plane of the fetal head relative to the level of the ischial spines of the maternal pelvis. An imaginary plane at the level of the spines is designated "zero station." Higher and lower stations are numbered at intervals of 1 cm and labeled as minus above and plus below. For example, "station minus three" is 3 cm above the spines, and "station plus two" is 2 cm below the spines. In breech presentation, the bitrochanteric diameter of the breech is used to determine station. See also dilation, effacement, labor.

station

Obstetrics The position or level of descent of the presenting part in the pelvis in a vaginal delivery; full engagement of the presenting part at the iliac spines is considered station 'zero'

station

stance.
References in classic literature ?
The two men watched the steamer round the bend, then, ascending arm in arm the slope of the bank, returned to the station.
Out of that void, at times, came canoes, and men with spears in their hands would suddenly crowd the yard of the station.
In reply to that objection, I would beg to ask what their station is.
Can it be wise to put this desirable and essential quality under the ban of the Constitution, and to declare that the moment it is acquired, its possessor shall be compelled to abandon the station in which it was acquired, and to which it is adapted?
I had to wait in the station for ten days--an eternity.
At a big station at a town the volunteers were again greeted with shouts and singing, again men and women with collecting boxes appeared, and provincial ladies brought bouquets to the volunteers and followed them into the refreshment room; but all this was on a much smaller and feebler scale than in Moscow.
And so, by a hair's-breadth, did she escape the treble risk of discovery which threatened her--from Geoffrey, on his way back; from Arnold, at his post; and from the valet, on the watch for her appearance at the station.
Jerry thanked her and seemed much pleased, and turning out of the station we at last reached home, and I, at least, was tired.
The wind was in their faces down the station road, blowing the dust into Mrs.
I failed to find Lord Hilton at his house, but I was told he was expected from London by the six o'clock train from Waterloo; and as it was then about a quarter past five, I went home, had some tea, and walked up to the station to waylay him.
At the station he took a ticket and said he was going to accompany her home.
The evening come, she put on her bonnet and shawl, and went quietly out: having her reasons for hovering in a furtive way about the station by which a passenger would arrive from Yorkshire, and for preferring to peep into it round pillars and corners, and out of ladies' waiting-room windows, to appearing in its precincts openly.