consciousness

(redirected from States of consciousness)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to States of consciousness: Altered states of consciousness, levels of consciousness

consciousness

 [kon´shus-nes]
1. the state of being conscious; fully alert, aware, oriented, and responsive to the environment.
2. subjective awareness of the aspects of cognitive processing and the content of the mind.
3. the current totality of experience of which an individual or group is aware at any time.
4. in psychoanalysis, the conscious.
5. in Newman's conceptual model, health as expanding consciousness, the informational capacity of the human system, or its capacity for interacting with the environment; consciousness is considered to be coextensive with the universe, residing in all matter.
clouding of consciousness see clouding of consciousness.
levels of consciousness
1. an early freudian concept referring to the conscious, preconscious, and unconscious.
2. the somewhat loosely defined states of awareness of and response to stimuli, generally considered an integral component of the assessment of an individual's neurologic status. Levels of consciousness range from full consciousness (behavioral wakefulness, orientation as to time, place, and person, and a capacity to respond appropriately to stimuli) to deep coma (complete absence of response).

Consciousness depends upon close interaction between the intact cerebral hemispheres and the central gray matter of the upper brainstem. Although the hemispheres contribute most of the specific components of consciousness (memory, intellect, and learned responses to stimuli), there must be arousal or activation of the cerebral cells before they can function. For this reason, it is suggested that a detailed description of the patient's response to specific auditory, visual, and tactile stimuli will be more meaningful to those concerned with neurologic assessment than would the use of such terms as alert, drowsy, stuporous, semiconscious, or other equally subjective labels. Standardized systems, such as the glasgow coma scale, aid in objective and less ambiguous evaluation of levels of consciousness.

Examples of the kinds of stimuli that may be used to determine a patient's responsiveness as a measure of consciousness include calling him by name, producing a sharp noise, giving simple commands, gentle shaking, pinching the biceps, and application of a blood pressure cuff. Responses to stimuli should be reported in specific terms relative to how the patient responded, whether the response was appropriate, and what occurred immediately after the response.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

con·scious·ness

(con'shŭs-nes),
The state of being aware, or perceiving physical facts or mental concepts; a state of general wakefulness and responsiveness to environment; a functioning sensorium.
[L. conscio, to know, to be aware of]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

consciousness

(kŏn′shəs-nĭs)
n.
1. The state or condition of being conscious.
2. In psychoanalysis, the conscious.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

con·scious·ness

(kon'shŭs-nĕs)
The state of being aware, or perceiving physical facts or mental concepts; a state of general wakefulness and responsiveness to environment; a functioning sensorium.
[L. conscio, to know, to be aware of]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

consciousness

Full awareness of self and of one's environment. The conviction that it is possible to explain the sources of consciousness has spawned a small library of books purporting to do so.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

con·scious·ness

(kon'shŭs-nĕs)
State of being aware, or perceiving physical facts or mental concepts; a state of general wakefulness and responsiveness to environment; a functioning sensorium.
[L. conscio, to know, to be aware of]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to this, Lewis-Williams (2002: 126-130) draws on laboratory-based scientific neurological research to corroborate his claim that at least some (if not all) of the rock art is an attempt to depict altered states of consciousness experienced by shamans during their trance dances rather than merely an attempt to represent scenes from the daily lives of the San.
Altered states of consciousness are being employed in different areas of psychology as treatment.
A complete account of the concept of craving, however, needs to take into consideration the contention (e.g., Tart, 1975) that at any given moment an individual may consciously experience one of various states of consciousness.
After Anisa concluded her vignette, other students chimed in with similar comments, some more or less fantastic, at times being linked to personal prayer and transcendent states of consciousness, at times expressing a very grounded sense of mental clarity.
Having discussed levels, or stages, of consciousness, I now need to differentiate between stages and states of consciousness. Whereas levels/stages of consciousness can also be thought of as enduring structures or traits, by which I mean relatively stable patterns of events in consciousness, states of consciousness are more temporary and relatively fleeting.
Whether trying to understand human beings, the universe, or spirituality in a guidance program, an integral exploration considers multiple perspectives, lines of development, levels of development, and states of consciousness. For the purposes of this article, the general description of Wilber's model is brief but the interested reader can refer to the citations of his work (Wilber, 1995, 1996a, 1996b, 1997, 2000) in the reference section.
But the names of patients, dates of birth and medical details such as blood pressure levels, states of consciousness and diseases should not be revealed to protect patients' rights.
However, as Pfaelzer concludes, feminist utopias often succeed in articulating utopian moments through their use of `multiple protagonists; multiple narrators; interpolated time frames; frequent shifts among past, present, and future; and frequent shifts among dreams, awakenings, and drug-induced states of consciousness' (`Response' 194).
of Neuropsychiatry), in their joint projects utilizing sodium amytal for the induction of altered states of consciousness. I transcribed the doctors' recorded interviews of postoperative amputees and brain tumor patients who, while under the drug, expressed strong feelings and fantasies, often about the recovery of missing body parts.
Followers of jnana yoga who discriminate between the real and the unreal, the permanent and the transitory, systematically impress upon themselves the impermanence of their own body and mind and its three states of consciousness: waking, dream, and dreamless sleep.
Chapters include: the science of psychology; the biological basis of behavior; sensation and perception; states of consciousness; learning; memory; cognition and mental abilities; motivation and emotion; life span development; personality; stress and health psychology; psychological disorders; therapies; social psychology; appendix--measurement and statistical methods.
Defending and developing a form of the theory of symbolism championed by Susanne Langer, he argues that music's importance can best be explained in terms of the connection between sounds and states of consciousness. The reason music is important in the lives of so many people, Addis contends, is that passages of music serve as "quasi-natural signs" (p.