consciousness

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Related to States of consciousness: Altered states of consciousness, levels of consciousness

consciousness

 [kon´shus-nes]
1. the state of being conscious; fully alert, aware, oriented, and responsive to the environment.
2. subjective awareness of the aspects of cognitive processing and the content of the mind.
3. the current totality of experience of which an individual or group is aware at any time.
4. in psychoanalysis, the conscious.
5. in Newman's conceptual model, health as expanding consciousness, the informational capacity of the human system, or its capacity for interacting with the environment; consciousness is considered to be coextensive with the universe, residing in all matter.
clouding of consciousness see clouding of consciousness.
levels of consciousness
1. an early freudian concept referring to the conscious, preconscious, and unconscious.
2. the somewhat loosely defined states of awareness of and response to stimuli, generally considered an integral component of the assessment of an individual's neurologic status. Levels of consciousness range from full consciousness (behavioral wakefulness, orientation as to time, place, and person, and a capacity to respond appropriately to stimuli) to deep coma (complete absence of response).

Consciousness depends upon close interaction between the intact cerebral hemispheres and the central gray matter of the upper brainstem. Although the hemispheres contribute most of the specific components of consciousness (memory, intellect, and learned responses to stimuli), there must be arousal or activation of the cerebral cells before they can function. For this reason, it is suggested that a detailed description of the patient's response to specific auditory, visual, and tactile stimuli will be more meaningful to those concerned with neurologic assessment than would the use of such terms as alert, drowsy, stuporous, semiconscious, or other equally subjective labels. Standardized systems, such as the glasgow coma scale, aid in objective and less ambiguous evaluation of levels of consciousness.

Examples of the kinds of stimuli that may be used to determine a patient's responsiveness as a measure of consciousness include calling him by name, producing a sharp noise, giving simple commands, gentle shaking, pinching the biceps, and application of a blood pressure cuff. Responses to stimuli should be reported in specific terms relative to how the patient responded, whether the response was appropriate, and what occurred immediately after the response.

con·scious·ness

(con'shŭs-nes),
The state of being aware, or perceiving physical facts or mental concepts; a state of general wakefulness and responsiveness to environment; a functioning sensorium.
[L. conscio, to know, to be aware of]

consciousness

/con·scious·ness/ (-nes)
1. the state of being conscious.
2. subjective awareness of the aspects of cognitive processing and the content of the mind.
3. the current totality of experience of which an individual or group is aware at any time.
4. the conscious.

consciousness

(kŏn′shəs-nĭs)
n.
1. The state or condition of being conscious.
2. In psychoanalysis, the conscious.

consciousness

[kon′shəsnes]
a clear state of awareness of self and the environment in which attention is focused on immediate matters, as distinguished from mental activity of an unconscious or subconscious nature.

con·scious·ness

(kon'shŭs-nĕs)
The state of being aware, or perceiving physical facts or mental concepts; a state of general wakefulness and responsiveness to environment; a functioning sensorium.
[L. conscio, to know, to be aware of]

consciousness

Full awareness of self and of one's environment. The conviction that it is possible to explain the sources of consciousness has spawned a small library of books purporting to do so.

con·scious·ness

(kon'shŭs-nĕs)
State of being aware, or perceiving physical facts or mental concepts; a state of general wakefulness and responsiveness to environment; a functioning sensorium.
[L. conscio, to know, to be aware of]

consciousness

the state of being conscious; responsiveness of the brain to impressions made by the senses. Altered states range from the normal, complete alertness to depression, confusion, delirium and finally loss of consciousness.
References in periodicals archive ?
As indicated earlier, there are several altered states of consciousness (ASC).
Tart, 1975) that at any given moment an individual may consciously experience one of various states of consciousness.
After Anisa concluded her vignette, other students chimed in with similar comments, some more or less fantastic, at times being linked to personal prayer and transcendent states of consciousness, at times expressing a very grounded sense of mental clarity.
Whereas levels/stages of consciousness can also be thought of as enduring structures or traits, by which I mean relatively stable patterns of events in consciousness, states of consciousness are more temporary and relatively fleeting.
Whether trying to understand human beings, the universe, or spirituality in a guidance program, an integral exploration considers multiple perspectives, lines of development, levels of development, and states of consciousness.
These texts have been selected firstly, because in all three accessing utopia takes place through a specific process of altering states of consciousness.
Addis's theory of sound's ontological affinity with states of consciousness by and large excludes any systematic consideration of the culturally symbolic constitution of reality, assuming instead an intrinsic relation between the nature of musical properties and that of their "nonmusical relata" (p.
Estimates suggest that 30-40% of individuals who survive severe TBI will stay in reduced states of consciousness for prolonged periods.
They're not abbreviations like Nabisco; they're not trademarked initials, like MCI, or descriptive conjunctions like "@Home," or even common words for states of consciousness, like "Excite.
1) She attributes to Dianthe several of hysteria's classic "conversion" or somatic symptoms, including trances, amnesia, fainting spells, lethargy, passivity, and dissociative states of consciousness, in order to investigate the politics of this illness.
Haining's anthology, first published in 1975 as The Hashish Club: An Anthology Of Drug Literature Volume Two collects together writing that was, it's safe to assume, largely written during altered states of consciousness.
Supernatural belief bound the individual to pre-rational states of consciousness and choked societies with doctrines invented in pre-modern times.