stasis

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stasis

 [sta´sis]
a stoppage or diminution of flow, as of blood or other body fluid, or of intestinal contents.
stasis syndrome overgrowth of bacteria within the small intestine resulting from a variety of conditions causing stasis, particularly disturbances to intestinal motility or decreased acid secretion, but also structural abnormalities such as diverticula, fistulae between the colon and upper bowel, or chronic obstruction; it is characterized by malabsorption of vitamin B12, steatorrhea, and anemia.
venous stasis cessation or impairment of venous flow, such as with venous insufficiency; see also stasis ulcer. Called also phlebostasis and venostasis.

sta·sis

, pl.

sta·ses

(stā'sis, stas'is; -ēz),
Stagnation of the blood or other fluids.
[G. a standing still]

stasis

(stā′sĭs, stăs′ĭs)
n. pl. stases (stā′sēz, stăs′ēz)
1. A condition of balance among various forces; motionlessness: "Language is a primary element of culture, and stasis in the arts is tantamount to death" (Charles Marsh).
2. Medicine Stoppage of the normal flow of a body substance, as of blood through an artery or of intestinal contents through the bowels.

stasis

A block in flow, usually of the peripheral circulation. See Venous stasis.

sta·sis

(stā'sis)
Stoppage of the blood or other fluids.
[G. a standing still]

stasis

A reduction or cessation of flow, as of blood or intestinal contents.

stasis

  1. an apparent stability, particularly in the fossil record of a particular organism, where no evolutionary change is seen over a long period of time.
  2. a period of lack of growth or its slowing in an organism.
  3. the slowing or cessation or movement of bodily fluids in animals.

sta·sis

(stā'sis)
Stagnation of the blood or other fluids.
[G. a standing still]
References in periodicals archive ?
As many as 250,000 political prisoners have had their lives turned upside down by the Stasi, an extension of the Ministry of State Security in the former East Germany.
Like Soviet Russia, the Stasi used sport as an effective tool to glorify East Germany's version of Communism, often doping those capable of competing on the world stage.
Oddly enough, the review itself is ostensibly a positive one, with the show earning three out of four stars, and with Stasi referring to it as "both revolting and compelling." All of which makes the writer's multitude of cheap shots seem all the more unnecessary, at least in the eyes of Dunham's fans and colleagues.
If this happens, the names of British Stasi sympathizers and spies could be revealed for the first time, The Guardian said.
The Stasi completed its interrogation in November 1983 and, come February 1984, both Horschig and Schlosser, who composed the band's songs, were sentenced to one and a half years in prison.
It is necessary to explain why the Stasi in general, and the special department for "combating political-ideological diversion and underground political activity" in particular, was so concerned with the surveillance of young people.
Primarily only those who perceive themselves to have been the Stasi's victims can find out if information has been collected about them.
Gary Bruce, The Firm: The Inside Story of the Stasi, Oxford University Press, Oxford and New York, 2010.
Betts seeks to look behind the accepted view of the failed communist state as a totalitarian nightmare in the grips of the infamous Stasi. He asks what exactly was the relationship between private and public spheres in the GDR because any totalitarian regime fears private space and private time as seedbeds for opposition.
Not exactly items that one would expect to rank high among the interests of the former East German Ministry of State Security, better known by its German acronym, "Stasi." Well, surprise, surprise.
But the clamor to develop an alternative risk transfer vehicle for health benefits began a few years back, according to Rick Stasi, chief operating officer for Avizent Alternative Risk.