starch

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starch

 [starch]
1. any of a group of polysaccharides of the general formula, (C6H10O5)n; it is the chief storage form of carbohydrates in plants.
2. granular material separated from mature corn (Zea mays), wheat, or potatoes; used as a dusting powder and pharmaceutic aid.

starch

(starch),
A high molecular weight polysaccharide made up of d-glucose residues consisting of 20% amylose and 80% amylopectin. amylose contains α-1,4 linkages, differing from cellulose in the presence of α- rather than β-glucoside linkages, and amylopectin contains additional α-1,6 linkages; both amylose and amylopectin exist in most most plant tissues. Starch is converted into dextrin when subject to the action of dry heat, and into dextrin and d-glucose by amylases and glucoamylases in saliva and pancreatic juice; used as a dusting powder, an emollient, and an ingredient in medicinal tablets; is an important raw material for the manufacture of alcohol, acetone, n-butanol, lactic acid, citric acid, glycerine, and gluconic acid by fermentation; is the chief storage carbohydrate in most higher plants.
Synonym(s): amylum
[A.S. stearc, strong]

starch

(stärch)
n.
1. A naturally abundant nutrient carbohydrate, (C6H10O5)n, found chiefly in the seeds, fruits, tubers, roots, and stem pith of plants, notably in corn, potatoes, wheat, and rice, and varying widely in appearance according to source but commonly prepared as a white amorphous tasteless powder.
2. starches Foods having a high content of starch, as rice, breads, and potatoes.

starch

(stahrch)
A high molecular weight polysaccharide built up of d-glucose residues in α-1,4 linkage, differing from cellulose in the presence of α- rather than β-glucoside linkages, which exists in most plant tissues; converted into dextrin when subjected to the action of dry heat, and into dextrin and d-glucose by amylases and glucoamylases in saliva and pancreatic juice; used as a dusting powder, an emollient, and an ingredient in medicinal tablets; chief storage carbohydrate in most higher plants.
[A.S. stearc, strong]

starch

A complex polysaccharide carbohydrate consisting of chains of linked glucose molecules. Amylose is a chain of 200 to 500 glucose units. Amylopectin consists of 20 cross-linked glucose molecules. Most natural starches are a mixture of these two. Starch, in the form of potatoes, rice and cereals forms an important part of the average diet and about 70% of the world's food.

starch

a polysaccharide carbohydrate consisting of GLUCOSE units arranged in two forms, amylose and amylopectin. Upon heating, the two components are separated, with amylose giving a purplish/blue colour when iodine is added and amylopectin giving a black colour, this forming the standard test for starch. Starch is the principal storage compound of plants as it is compact and non-osmotic. see DEXTRIN.

starch

(stahrch)
High molecular weight polysaccharide made up of d-glucose residues consisting of 20% amylose and 80% amylopectin.
Synonym(s): amylum.
[A.S. stearc, strong]
References in periodicals archive ?
Numerous reasons for non-compliance with reading have been discussed and, as cited in Starcher & Profitt (2011), include lack of student motivation (Rothkopf, 1988), lack of congruence between student and professor goals for the course (Nolen, 1996), and poor understanding of the role of the assigned reading (Brest & Bradley, 2006).
Starcher, demanded a recount, but it was no contest.
"I think it will be a while, and it should be a while until we get to that wild state of price increases," says Starcher.
"The devil is always in the details, and implementing callback is no different," notes Starcher.
"a clown." (29) Maynard and Starcher recused themselves from
24, 2011) (on file with author); E-mail from Roger Starcher, Investigator, Council for Children's Rights, Charlotte, N.C., to author (Aug.
(iv) Daft, R., Lengel, R., (2000), Fusion Leadership, (p 176), A personal communication from George Starcher and Dorothy Marcic, 1994., Berrett-Koehler Publ., San Francisco, CA
In recusing himself, Justice Larry Starcher, who was originally in the minority, starkly described "Blankenship's bestowal of his personal wealth, political tactics, and 'friendship'" as a "cancer in the affairs of this Court." (99) With Benjamin in the three-person majority, the West Virginia Supreme Court again decided to vacate the judgment against Massey, which precipitated Caperton's appeal to the United States Supreme Court.
(20.) Zhao R, Bruning E, Rossetti D, Starcher B, Seiberg M, Iotsova-Stone V.
This presumably has to do with the history of various utilities' service territories and the remoteness of the non-ERCOT locations (for example the Panhandle is closer to Kansas than to Dallas, notes Kenneth Starcher of the Alternative Energy Institute in Canyon), but Texplainer is still figuring out the particulars on this.
(31) In addition, Massey successfully moved for the recusal of Justice Starcher, who had been publicly critical of the role Blankenship had played in the 2004 election of Justice Benjamin.
(12.) Hardy AM, Starcher ET 2nd, Morgan WM, Druker J, Kristal A, Day JM, Kelly C, Ewing E, Curran JW.