Staphylococcus aureus

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Related to Staph aureus: Staph epidermidis, Strep pyogenes

Staph·y·lo·coc·cus au·re·us

a common species found especially on nasal mucous membrane and skin (hair follicles); bacterial species that produces exotoxins including those that cause toxic shock syndrome, with resulting skin rash, and renal, hepatic, and central nervous system disease, and an enterotoxin associated with food poisoning; it causes furunculosis, cellulitis, pyemia, pneumonia, osteomyelitis, endocarditis, suppuration of wounds, other infections; also a cause of infection in burn patients; humans are the chief reservoir. The type species of the genus Staphylococcus.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Staphylococcus aureus

Staphylococcus pyogenes Microbiology The most common pathogenic staphylococcus, which is often part of the normal human microflora, and linked to opportunistic infections Predisposing factors Nonspecific immune defects–Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, chronic granulomatous disease, hypogammaglobulinemia, folliculitis; skin injury–burns, surgery; presence of foreign bodies–eg, sutures, prosthetic devices; systemic disease–eg, CA, alcoholism, heart disease, viral infection; antibiotic therapy Clinical Folliculitis, bronchopneumonia
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Staph·y·lo·coc·cus au·re·us

(staf'i-lō-kok'ŭs aw'rē-ŭs)
A bacterial common species found especially on nasal mucous membranes and skin (hair follicles); it causes furunculosis, cellulitis, pyemia, pneumonia, osteomyelitis, endocarditis, suppuration of wounds, other infections, and food poisoning; also a cause of infection in burn patients. Humans are the chief reservoir. The type species of the genus Staphylococcus.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Staph·y·lo·coc·cus au·re·us

(staf'i-lō-kok'ŭs aw'rē-ŭs)
Common species found especially on nasal mucous membranes and skin (hair follicles); bacterial species that produces exotoxins including those that cause toxic shock syndrome, with resulting skin rash, and renal, hepatic, and central nervous system disease, and an enterotoxin associated with food poisoning; it causes furunculosis, cellulitis, pyemia, pneumonia, osteomyelitis, endocarditis, suppuration of wounds, other infections; also a cause of infection in burn patients; humans are the chief reservoir. The type species of the genus Staphylococcus.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about Staphylococcus aureus

Q. What is MRSA? I’ve heard on the news that some hospitals have a higher rate of MRSA infection. What is MRSA?

A.
MRSA - Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus, is a nick name for a specific subtype of bacteria from the Staph bacteria family, which is found resistant to many of the common antibiotics that are in use today. This is due to a mutation development in the Staph bacteria, which allowed it to grow resistance against the killing ingredient in common antibiotics, therefore making it a harder infection to treat and cure. Hospitals keep track of their MRSA infections for epidemiological reasons, in order to get a perspective on bacterial resistance to antibiotics, hoping new and more effective antibiotic medication will be researched.

Q. My father was hospitalized for pneumonia. The doctors said they are afraid of HA-MRSA. Why is it so scary? My father was hospitalized for pneumonia last week. The doctors wanted to discharge him as quick as possible because they said that they are afraid of Hospital Acquired Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-MRSA). Why is it so scary?

A. Hospital Acquired Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of sepsis and death due to the fact that are very limited antibiotics that kill it.
Because of this it is the nightmare of doctors.
This bacteria is very durable and is very common in hospitals, and because of it, its always better to be at the hospital the minimum time needed.

Q. can staphylococcus in woman cause infertility? staphylococcus/infertility

A. Not that I know about. One of the major routes in which bacteria cause infertility in women is through inflammation of the pelvis (PID), but staphylococcus isn't a major cause of this disease.

You may read more here:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000888.htm

More discussions about Staphylococcus aureus
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References in periodicals archive ?
We believe that the properties of our lysins will make them suitable for targeting antibiotic-resistant organisms, such as Staph aureus and P.
Biopsy report showed chronic nonspecific osteomyelitis and Culture and Sensitivity showed Staph aureus sensitive to cefoperazone.
Out of the 23 Staph aureus 13 were MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staph aureus) and 10 were MSSA (Methicillin- sensitive Staph aureus).
coli, Staph aureus and Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci, but not Streptococcal bacteria.
Washington, Feb 15 ( ANI ): Methicillin resistant staph aureus (MRSA) infections are antibiotic-resistant and can cause a innumerable problems like bone erosion, or osteomyelitis, which curtail the effective life of an implant and significantly hampers replacement of that implant.
Table 1: Distribution of Staph aureus and MRSA among varuous clinical samples.
Methodology: One hundred and thirty clinical specimens from hospital patients were inoculated on MacConkey and blood agar plates, incubated overnight at 370C to isolate Staph aureus. MRSA strains were then identified as pink or mauve colonies on CHROMagar MRSA culture medium (CHROMagar Microbiology, Paris, France).
Philip Tierno found germs on gym equipment including staph aureus, klebsiella, enterobacter and E.
"It could be used widely if we could deliver it in such a way that would prevent any emerging resistance from happening in what I call the naive population of United States Staph aureus."
The threats to students, patients and others include new strains of infection termed "Super Bugs," such as MRSA (Methicillin resistant strain of Staph aureus), which are resistant to most, and sometimes all, antibiotic and other treatments.
ABBREVIATIONS: bDNA = Branched DNA; DNA = Deoxyribonucleic Acid; dNTP = Deoxyribonucleotides; dATP = Deoxyadenosine Triphosphate; dCTP = Deoxycytidine Triphosphate; dGTP = Deoxyguanosine Triphosphate; dTTP = Deoxythymidine Triphosphate; FDA = Food and Drug Administration; FRET = Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer; MRSA = Methicillin Resistant Staph aureus; MTB = Mycobacterium tuberculosis; NASBA = Nucleic Acid Sequence Based Amplification; PCR = Polymerase Chain Reaction; PFGE = Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis; RT-PCR = Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction; Taq = Thermus aquaticus; TMA = Transcription-Mediated Amplification; VRE = Vancomycin Resistant Enterococcus.