Stanford-Binet intelligence scale


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Related to Stanford-Binet intelligence scale: Stanford-Binet Intelligence Test

Stan·ford-Bi·net in·tel·li·gence scale

(stan'fŏrd bē-nā'),
a standardized test, an elaboration of the Binet-Simon scale, for the measurement of intelligence consisting of a series of questions, graded according to the intelligence of normal children at different ages, the answers to which indicate the mental age of the person tested; primarily used with children. It also has norms for adults standardized against adult age levels rather than, as formerly, those of children.
Synonym(s): Stanford-Binet test

Stan·ford-Bi·net in·tel·li·gence scale

(stan'fŏrd bi-nā' in-tel'i-jĕns skāl)
A standardized test for the measurement of intelligence consisting of a series of questions, graded according to the intelligence of normal children at different ages, the answers to which indicate the mental age of the person tested; primarily used with children, but also contains norms for adults standardized against adult age levels.
Synonym(s): Binet scale, Binet test.

Binet,

Alfred, French psychologist, 1857-1911.
Binet age - the age of the normal child with whose intelligence (as measured by the Stanford-Binet scale) the intelligence of the abnormal child corresponds.
Binet scale - Synonym(s): Binet-Simon scale
Binet-Simon scale - forerunner of individual intelligence tests designed for children and adults, sometimes referred to as the Binet scale. Synonym(s): Binet scale
Binet test - Synonym(s): Stanford-Binet intelligence scale
Stanford-Binet intelligence scale - see under Stanford

Stanford,

American University where the test was revised for use in the U.S.
Stanford-Binet intelligence scale - a standardized test for the measurement of intelligence. Synonym(s): Binet test
References in periodicals archive ?
SBIS: FE = Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale: Fourth Edition (Thorndike, Hagen, & Sattler, 1986).
Predicting IQ of biologically "at risk" children from age 3 to school entry: sensitivity and specificity of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale IV.
At the end of both phases, the principal investigator used the Stanford-Binet intelligence Scale, Form L-M, to test all subjects except two mute children who were examined using the Cattell Infant Scale.
Mensa's requirement for membership is a score at or above the 98th percentile on certain standardized IQ or other approved intelligence tests, such as the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales. The minimum accepted score on the Stanford-Binet is 132, while for the Cattell it is 148.
According to the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales, he has an IQ of 64 and qualifies for services under the exceptionality of mental retardation.

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