Universal Precautions

(redirected from Standard Precaution)

U·ni·ver·sal Pre·cau·tions

(yū'ni-ver'săl prē-kaw'shŭnz),
(in full, Universal Blood and Body Fluid Precautions). A set of procedural directives and guidelines published in August 1987 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (as Recommendations for Prevention of HIV Transmission in Health-Care Settings) to prevent parenteral, mucous membrane, and nonintact skin exposures of health care workers to bloodborne pathogens. In December 1991, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) promulgated its Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens Standard, incorporating universal precautions and imposing detailed requirements on employers of health care workers, including engineering controls, provision of protective barrier devices, standardized labeling of biohazards, mandatory training of employees in Universal Precautions, management of accidental parenteral exposure incidents, and availability to employees of immunization against hepatitis B.

The principle underlying universal precautions is that the blood and certain other body fluids of all recipients of health care are to be considered potentially infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and other bloodborne pathogens. Universal precautions apply to blood, unfixed tissues (except intact skin), cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid, pleural fluid, peritoneal fluid, pericardial fluid, amniotic fluid, semen, and vaginal secretions, but not to feces, nasal secretions, sputum, sweat, tears, urine, or vomitus unless these materials contain visible blood. Specific precautions are prescribed with respect to mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, surgery, invasive diagnostic procedures, obstetrics, renal dialysis, dentistry, clinical laboratories, morgues, and morticians' services. Barrier devices such as gloves, gowns, waterproof aprons, masks, and protective eyewear are required in certain settings, to prevent exposure to blood and other biologically hazardous materials. The OSHA standard requires glove wear for phlebotomy and intraoral examinations and manipulations. Standards are also imposed for laundry, cleaning of surfaces, and disposal of contaminated wastes. Special precautions are advised for handling needles, scalpels, and other sharp instruments or devices after use. Immunization with HBV vaccine is recommended as an important adjunct to universal precautions for health care workers exposed to blood. Universal precautions are intended to supplement, not replace, routine procedures for infection control such as handwashing and using gloves to prevent gross contamination of the hands. Implementation of universal precautions does not eliminate the need for other category- or disease-specific isolation precautions, such as enteric precautions for infectious diarrhea and respiratory isolation for pulmonary tuberculosis.

Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
A method of infection control—recommended by the CDC—in which all human blood, certain body fluids, as well as fresh tissues and cells of human origin are handled as if they are known to be infected with HIV, HBV, and/or other blood-borne pathogens
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

universal precautions

Infectious disease A method of infection control–recommendations issued by CDC–in which all human blood, certain body fluids, as well as fresh tissues and cells of human origin, are treated as if known to be infected with HIV, HBV, and/or other blood-borne pathogens. See Precautions, Reverse precautions. Cf Body substance isolation.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

U·ni·ver·sal Pre·cau·tions

(yū'ni-vĕr'săl prĕ-kaw'shŭnz)
(in full, Universal Blood and Body Fluid Precautions). A set of procedural directives and guidelines published in August 1987 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (as Recommendations for Prevention of HIV Transmission in Health-Care Settings) to prevent parenteral, mucous membrane, and nonintact skin exposures of health care workers to bloodborne pathogens. In December 1991, the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) promulgated its Occupational Exposure to Bloodborne Pathogens Standard, incorporating universal precautions and imposing detailed requirements on employers of health care workers, including engineering controls, provision of protective barrier devices, standardized labeling of biohazards, mandatory training of employees in the Universal Precautions, management of accidental parenteral exposure incidents, and availability to employees of immunization against hepatitis B virus.

u·ni·ver·sal pre·cau·tions

(yū'ni-vĕr'săl prē-kaw'shŭnz)
Generally, acting under the assumption that all bodily fluids may be contaminated. See: Universal Precautions.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

U·ni·ver·sal Pre·cau·tions

(yūni-vĕrsăl prĕ-kawshŭnz)
(in full, Universal Blood and Body Fluid Precautions). A set of procedural directives and guidelines published in August 1987 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (as Recommendations for Prevention of HIV Transmission in Health-Care Settings) to prevent parenteral, mucous membrane, and nonintact skin exposures of health care workers to bloodborne pathogens.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Relationship between patient safety climate and standard precaution adherence: a systematic review of the literature.
In line with Chinese and Brazilian studies [6,21], this study also revealed that HCWs who took training on standard precaution guidelines were more likely to always comply with SPs as compared to nontrained HCWs.
In remarks marking Global Handwashing Day (GHD), a campaign to motivate and mobilise millions around the world to improve their hand-washing habits, Head of Primary Healthcare at the ministry, Dr Bashir Al Qassir, said washing of hands is a standard precaution for infection control at hospitals and clinics.
As a standard precaution emergency services attended the aircraft.
She said the ward was closed to admissions and visitors as a standard precaution to contain the virus.
"It was a standard precaution taken by the fire service in these types of incidents.
Smoly's hands and feet were shackled during the court appearance, a standard precaution that jail authorities take when an inmate is considered to represent a security threat, Lane County sheriff's Capt.
He had barricaded the door of his room with chairs, a standard precaution by a man who felt that Israeli intelligence has been after him for 20 years.
Medi-Clinic said gloves, masks and protective clothing were used as a standard precaution, 'but whatever the virus was it obviously transcended what we had in place'.
Checkpoints were also closed along Iraq's border with Jordan and Syria, a standard precaution taken during domestic emergencies.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends providing standard precaution and droplet isolation for 5 days after symptom onset in hospitalized patients who are suspected or confirmed to have influenza.
"It is a standard precaution and happens regularly."