staircase

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stair·case

(stār'kās),
A series of reactions that follow one another in progressively increasing or decreasing intensity, so that a chart shows a continuous rise or fall. See: treppe.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

stair·case

(stār'kās)
A series of reactions that follow one another in progressively increasing or decreasing intensity, so that a chart shows a continuous rise or fall.
See also: treppe
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
Sorelli herself, on the day after the adventure of the fireman, placed a horseshoe on the table in front of the stage-door-keeper's box, which every one who entered the Opera otherwise than as a spectator must touch before setting foot on the first tread of the staircase. This horse-shoe was not invented by me--any more than any other part of this story, alas!--and may still be seen on the table in the passage outside the stage-door-keeper's box, when you enter the Opera through the court known as the Cour de l'Administration.
"All carved oak, right up to the ceiling, just the same as you saw on the staircase."
The staircase was as wooden and solid as need be, and Affery went straight down it without any of those deviations peculiar to dreams.
Sparsit, in her chamber window, resting from her packing operations, looked towards her great staircase and saw Louisa still descending.
Another group of characters had now partly descended the staircase. The first was a venerable and white-bearded patriarch, who cautiously felt his way downward with a staff.
"Oh!" said he, "good and honorable pavement of Paris, cursed staircase, fit to put the angels of Jacob's ladder out of breath!
At the same moment, whilst D'Artagnan was leaning over the aperture to listen, a metallic sound, as if some one was moving a bag of gold, struck on his ear; he started; instantly afterward a door opened and a light played upon the staircase.
A fearful cry, followed by a violent blow against the door, made the whole staircase resound with the echo.
Such a staircase, with its accessories, in the older and more crowded parts of Paris, would be bad enough now; but, at that time, it was vile indeed to unaccustomed and unhardened senses.
Tilney, must be, as certainly as her memory could guide her, exactly over this suspected range of cells, and the staircase by the side of those apartments of which she had caught a transient glimpse, communicating by some secret means with those cells, might well have favoured the barbarous proceedings of her husband.
We entered it, and found the trap-door which led to the staircase, but we had great difficulty in raising it, because the prince had fastened it down underneath with the plaster he had brought with him.
"Yes, he is in the courtyard at the bottom of the staircase, receiving the instructions of the Governor; he will presently come up."