Stachybotrys atra


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Stachybotrys atra

obsolete name for Stachybotrys chartarum.
See also: stachybotryotoxicosis.

Stachybotrys atra

Mycology A mold found in straw and hay, which causes mycosis and fatal GI hemorrhage in cattle and horses; humans may be infected through occupational exposure or after floods, where moist carpets, paper and other fibers provide optimal growth conditions for S atra, a toxic mold; exposed infants may develop life-threatening pulmonary hemorrhage

Stachybotrys atra, S. alternans, S. chartarum

a fungus that grows on stored feed and produces trichothecene mycotoxins. Poisoning is characterized by diarrhea, necrotic ulcers in the mouth, mucosal petechiation and agranulocytosis. See also satratoxins. Poisoning called alimentary toxic aleucia.
References in periodicals archive ?
1987), "Trichothecene Mycotoxins in Aerosolized Conidia of Stachybotrys atra," Applied Environmental Microbiology, 53:1370-1375.
Guidelines on Assessment and Remediation of Stachybotrys atra (chartarum) in Indoor Environments, Revised (1998), New York: New York City Department of Health.
Clinical Epidemiological Investigation of Health Effects Caused by Stachybotrys atra Building Contamination.
Stachybotrys chartarum, also known as Stachybotrys atra, is a greenish-black mold that can grow on material with a high cellulose and low nitrogen content, such as fiberboard, gypsum board, paper, dust, and lint.
For example, Stachybotrys atra has a high moisture requirement, so it grows where moisture has accumulated from roof or wall leaks, or chronically wet areas from plumbing leaks.
hemosiderosis in infants and exposure to molds, specifically Stachybotrys chartarum, commonly referred to by its synonym Stachybotrys atra, was not proven.
Stachybotrys atra produces airborne toxins that can cause inflammation and injury in the gastrointestinal and pulmonary tissues in children and adults.
The quantity of fungi, including the toxigenic fungus Stachybotrys atra (whose toxins have been implicated in hemorrhagic disorders in animals), was higher in the homes of case-infants than in those of controls (OR=1.