St John's wort


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Related to St John's wort: valerian

St John's wort

Hypericum perforatum Herbal medicine A perennial herb that contains flavonoids, glycosides, mucilage, tannins, volatile oil; it is antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, astringent, expectorant, sedative; as an antidepressant, it is overrated, proving ineffective in double-blinded placebo-controlled trials Toxicology SJW may interfere with OCs, anti-HIV agents, transplant drugs, anti-depressants; it causes HTN, headaches, N&V; it may also interact with amphetamines, amino acids–tryptophan, tyrosine, antiasthmatic inhalants, beer, wine, chocolate, coffee, fava beans, cold and hay fever agents, narcotics, nasal decongestants, smoked or pickled foods. See Herbal medicine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Those on St John's wort reported 172 adverse effects.
However, St John's Wort does interact with some prescription medicines so it's important that you tell any doctor who may be treating you if you're taking this supplement.
Joanne Barnes, a research fellow at the University of London, said: "The evidence so far is not overwhelming, but it would be premature to dismiss St John's Wort on the basis of one uncontrolled study.
Oral contraceptives: Taking St John's Wort and the Pill can lead to breakthrough bleeding and increase the risk of pregnancy.
The herb St John's wort, has two unique components, hypericin and hyperforin, which have an antidepressant action.
The two major constituents of St John's wort, hypericin and hyperforin, have been shown to possess substantial medicinal activity, while other compounds including the flavonoids rutin, quercetin and kaempferol also appear to have medicinal properties (Klemow 2011).
St John's wort extract (Ze 117) does not alter the pharmacokinetics of a low-dose oral contraceptive.
Also effective against SIH were the following St John's wort constituents: hyperoside (1.
The St John's Wort had prevented her anticonvulsant medication from working.
The alternatives that spring to mind include: i) sertraline was not effective, ii) St John's wort and sertraline were no different, and iii) the patients in this study did not respond to antidepressant treatments that have previously been shown to be effective.
St John's Wort, a supplement taken to alleviate mild to moderate depression, is known to counteract the effect of certain drugs, including hormonebased contraceptives.
As St John's Wort can't be taken with certain other drugs, check with a herbalist before taking.