Squamata

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Related to Squamates: order Squamata

Squamata

an order of reptiles containing the lizards and snakes, which have a skin with horny epidermal scales or shields. The moveable quadrate bone makes it possible to move the upper jaw with respect to the braincase.
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Ross, "A review of Salmonella and squamates (lizards, snakes and amphisbians): implications for public health," Pathogens, vol.
The outer, beta keratin-rich layer of the squamate epidermis bears intricate fine sculpturing (microornamentation), which varies from base to apex of an individual scale.
(1999): Squamates (Reptilia) from the Upper Cretaceous of Lano (Basque Country, Spain).
Ashton and Feldman [17] found that turtles follow Bergmann's rule whereas squamates contrast it.
It is widely assumed that there is a functional relationship in squamates between flicking of the tongue and delivery of chemical cues to the vomeronasal system (VNS; see Young, 1993), Electrophysiological data have demonstrated a close temporal correlation between the activity pattern of the tongue retractor system and stimulation of the sensory receptors in the vomeronasal organs (VNO; Meredith & Burghardt, 1978).
In squamates, researchers have demonstrated a positive correlation between adult body size and age at maturation (e.g., Dunham & Miles 1985).
"Squamates" is the name for lizards--including snakes and limbless lizards.
This Grey-Banded Kingsnake is just one species that's part of a group of animals called squamates (SKWAH-mates).
Typical n ode-based definitions, then, might read as follows: "Lepidosauria is the most recent common ancestor of Sphenodon and squamates and all of its descendants" or "Mammalia is the most recent common ancestor of montremes and therians and all of their descendants."
It is widely assumed that there is a functional relationship in squamates between extrusion of the tongue (tongue flick behavior) and delivery of chemical cues to the vomeronasal system (VNS).
It remains to be seen how mortality risk is distributed in natural populations of squamates, but the effect still calls the generality of the Shine and Schwarzkopf (1992) model into serious question (Niewiarowski and Dunham 1994).