domestic violence

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Related to Spousal abuse: Husband abuse

do·mes·tic vi·o·lence

(dō-mes'tik vī'ō-lens),
Intentionally inflicted injury perpetrated by and on family member(s); varieties include spouse abuse, child abuse, and sexual abuse, including incest. Various kinds of abuse, such as sexual abuse, also happen outside the family unit. The American Medical Association and similar organizations outside the U.S. have issued advisory notices to physicians on the detection and treatment of domestic violence.

domestic violence

A pattern of sexual, emotional, psychological or financial abuse of a current or former partner, often punctuated by physical assault or credible threats of bodily harm, occurring in the home.
 
Risk factors
Partner abuse of substances and/or alcohol; intermittent employment or unemployment; lower education.

Medspeak-UK
As defined in the UK, any violence between partners in an intimate relationship, wherever and whenever the violence occurs. DV victims suffer on many levels—health, housing, education­—and lack freedom to live meaningful lives without fear.

Domestic violence in the UK, facts of interest
• Accounts for 16% of all violent crime.
• Has more repeat victims than any other crime (on average there are 35 assaults before a victim calls the police).
• Claims the lives of 2 women/week.
• 60% of offenders are unemployed; many have mental health issues; 36% witnessed violence between their own parents; 48% are alcohol dependent.

domestic violence

Battering Public health A pattern of psychological, economic, and sexual coercion of one partner in a relationship by the other, often punctuated by physical assaults, or credible threats of bodily harm; physical abuse by a 'significant other'–boy/girlfriend, lover, spouse at home Risk factors Partner abuse of substances, alcohol; intermittent employment, unemployment; less than high school education; perpetrator: former spouse, ex-boyfriend. See Abusive behavior, Criminal victimization.

do·mes·tic vi·o·lence

(dŏ-mĕs'tik vī'ŏ-lĕns)
Intentionally inflicted injury perpetrated by and on family member(s); varieties include spouse abuse, child abuse, and sexual abuse, including incest. Various kinds of abuse (e.g., sexual abuse) also happen outside of the family unit.

do·mes·tic vi·o·lence

(dŏ-mĕs'tik vī'ŏ-lĕns)
Intentionally inflicted injury perpetrated by and on family member(s); varieties include spousal abuse, child abuse, and sexual abuse, including incest.

Patient discussion about domestic violence

Q. What should I do if I think there is a domestic violence in my building? I think there is a case of domestic violence going on in with my neighbors. I have heard a man hitting a woman and a woman screaming, things being thrown, etc. This type of event will happen several times a week, lasting all day. I'm not sure where my place is on this, since I don't know them, and I don’t even know what neighbor it is, but I hate just sitting here doing nothing while a man is beating a woman. I don’t know what to do. Please help.

A. I have been on the receiving end of domestic violence. I have only been out for about 1yr and 3 months. I almost lost my children due to the issues. The best thing you can do is report it. Even though the person will never leave the situation until either someone intervenes, or they almost lose their life. They can get possibly die from it. domestic issues tend to escalate instead of subsiding. Also there is the problem that the person in the situation may have been threatened and their self esteem is usually in the gutter. I wasnt allowed out of my house and when I did go out I had to look at the ground. If my boyfriend thought that i was looking at someone male or female I usually got hit.

Q. Is “domestic violence” can be considered a medical issue? Is it curable? My partner is showing scary signs of violence…can it be treated with some sort of medication?

A. you can also tyr to get him into an anger management class,that might also help both of you.

More discussions about domestic violence
References in periodicals archive ?
'Spousal abuse does not just start, it starts with the fact that an abuser was born in a home where there was disconnect, family issues and domestic violence.
That is why in the midst of excruciating spousal abuse an average Esan woman would want to remain in her matrimonial home.
(105) In determining that spousal abuse meant that, in a "large
"The suggestion presented by the council doesn't give an explanation on what spousal abuse for financial gain means," he said.
The second part looks at contemporary single life; same-sex marriage, parenting, and divorce; children and parenting in modern marriages; money aspects; race; public policies on spousal abuse, divorce, and welfare; and issues such as gender and gay rights and dating services.
Examples might be when the police are summoned to stop an incident of spousal abuse. The urgent need to protect the goods of life and health in such cases make it imprudent to wait for other family members or other intermediate groups to intervene.
Spousal abuse in the child's presence ranked 64% among the forms of neglect.
After being a frightened, beaten, humiliated victim of spousal abuse, White transformed her life and discovered the strength she needed to leave her husband and begin working to support her children.
In multivariate analyses, men's lifetime history of physical spousal abuse was positively associated with being older than 24, having a below-secondary education, being of low or middle household wealth status, recent drug or alcohol use, poor mental health and agreeing that wife-beating is justified (odds ratios, 1.6-2.8).
detail, the devastating effects that spousal abuse can have on a family.
We have learned that violent criminals, sexual offenders, and children who are prone to other forms of anti-social behavior toward humans are more likely to abuse animals; both perpetrators and victims of bullying are more likely to abuse animals; witnessing animal abuse has a damaging traumatic effect on some children and "teaches" others to use violence to solve interpersonal problems; the same issues of control and dominance that underlie spousal abuse also are operative in animal abuse; and often women are held hostage to threats to their beloved companion animals.
to ongoing court cases concerning unauthorized cell-gathering for research, the story of Henrietta Lacks and her family is heartrending and befuddling--the former because the story of medical mistreatment, spousal abuse, heartache, and suffering cannot help but be moving; the latter because, to a reader raised in the luxury of a middle class world and indoctrinated in strict professional ethical codes, the patient's well-being always is placed first.