sports drink

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A thirst-quenching beverage used in sports and related activities, to rehydrate, boost energy and replenish electrolytes lost to sweating. All sports drinks contain water, sugar, salt, potassium; some contain extras—e.g., amino acids—meant to build muscle mass

sports drink

Performance drink Sports medicine A thirst-quenching beverage used in sports-related activities, which may boost energy and/or help build muscle mass; water, sugar, salt, potassium are common to all SDs. See Hydrotherapy, Water.
Sports drink
True Isotonic drinks Replace fluid and electrolytes lost during lengthy exercise
Carbohydrate drinks Contain glucose polymers and are intended to replenish energy reserves during and after exercise
Protein drinks Amino acid drinks Commonly made of whey, a bovine milk product and are used to help recuperate fatigued or overly stressed muscles NY Times 7/12/94; C6
References in periodicals archive ?
[ClickPress, Sat Apr 13 2019] Sports drinks are specially formulated beverages to help keep the body hydrated during or after exercise or sports activity.
"Although daily consumption of sports drinks has decreased overall, sugar-sweetened sports drinks remain popular, with the majority of high school students drinking them at least weekly," the authors write.
It found that a banana, with its all-natural package, provides comparable or greater anti-inflammatory and other benefits for athletes than sports drinks. But there may be a downside, and it involves bloating.
It is naturally high in potassium and vitamin C, which aids muscle function, low in sodium - unlike some sports drinks - and has natural sugars that speed up the body's fluid intake.
Academics at Cardiff University and Cardiff Metropolitan University found that nearly 90% of 12 to 14-year-olds are consuming sports drinks such as Lucozade Sport, Powerade, and Gatorade.
BDA chairman Mick Armstrong said: "Sports drinks offer no health benefits to children and are helping fuel an epidemic of tooth decay.
Consumer demand for more natural food and beverage products generally, and specifically those made without artificial colors, flavors, and other additives, extends to energy and sports drinks. This trend has created gaps in the market that several small start-ups and, increasingly, not-so-small acquirers and new entrants, are aggressively attempting to fill.
Among the measured variables in this study were height and weight; consumption frequency for sports drinks, energy drinks, and breakfast; time spent engaged in physical activity, playing video games, and watching television; and smoking status.
The campaign to remove BVO in sports drinks was all started by a Mississippi teenager named Sarah Kavanagh.
This may be as simple as grabbing a sports drink first thing in the morning, then using fountains, coolers and cafeteria beverages as triggers for drinking throughout the day.