spontaneous bacterial peritonitis


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spontaneous bacterial peritonitis

Spontaneous peritonitis Critical care A severe acute infection of the peritoneum that accompanies end-stage liver disease and ascites Agents E coli, Klebsiella spp, S pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis Clinical Abdominal pain, ascites, chills, encephalopathy, fever, rebound tenderness Lab Ascitic fluid has > 500–often 10,000+ PMNs/mm3, protein > 1.0 g/dL, monomicrobials; 40% are culture-negative Risk factors Cirrhosis, nephrotic syndrome, peptic ulcer disease, appendicitis, diverticulitis Treatment 3rd-generation cephalosporins–eg, cefotaxime, + IV albumin Mortality 30-40%, less if treated early, worse if accompanied by signs of poor liver function–eg, upper GI bleeding, BR > 8 mg/dL, serum albumin < 2.5 g/dL, hepatic encephalopathy, hepatorenal syndrome. See Peritonitis.
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3%) out of 70 patients were diagnosed to have spontaneous bacterial peritonitis.
Role of proton pump inhibitors in the occurrence and the prognosis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in cirrhotic patients with ascites.
It is negatively associated with complications like ascites, Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis (SBP), encephalopathy and hepatorenal syndrome.
Effect of intravenous albumin on renal impairment and mortality in patients with cirrhosis and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis.
Nonselective (3 blockers increase risk for hepatorenal syndrome and death in patients with cirrhosis and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis.
In patients with liver cirrhosis who have had previous bleeding from esophageal varices, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis presence, or some other bacterial infection, it is recommended to apply prophylactic oral antibiotic treatment for seven days per month for the purpose of selective intestinal decontamination [15, 16].
Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) is the most frequent and life-threatening infection in patients with liver cirrhosis, requiring prompt recognition and treatment.
Bacterial overgrowth in segments of the intestinal tract not normally inhabited by high loads of microbes is implicated in the pathogenesis of diverse clinical problems such as biliary tract infection, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis complicating cirrhosis, exacerbations of inflammatory bowel diseases and infections that complicate major trauma or surgery (4,5).
Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) is a common complication in cirrhotic patients with ascites.
We excluded patients with liver carcinoma or other neoplasms, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, systemic infections, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP), or recent antibacterial therapy (previous 2 weeks) and those receiving prophylactic norfloxacin, corticosteroid treatment, or pentoxifylline.

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