spondylolisthesis

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spondylolisthesis

 [spon″dĭ-lo-lis-the´sis]
forward displacement of a vertebra over a lower segment due to a congenital defect or fracture in the pars interarticularis, usually of the fifth lumbar over the sacrum, or of the fourth lumbar over the fifth. adj., adj spondylolisthet´ic.

spon·dy·lo·lis·the·sis

(spon'di-lō-lis-thē'sis), [MIM*184200]
Forward movement of the body of one of the lower lumbar vertebrae on the vertebra below it, or on the sacrum.
Synonym(s): spondyloptosis
[spondylo- + G. olisthēsis, a slipping and falling]

spondylolisthesis

(spŏn′dl-ō-lĭs-thē′sĭs)
n.
Forward displacement of one of the lower lumbar vertebrae over the vertebra below it or on the sacrum.

spondylolisthesis

Orthopedics The forward slippage of a lumbar vertebra on the vertebra inferior thereto, which usually involves lumbar vertebra, most often at the level between the 5th lumbar vertebra and the 1st sacral vertebra; ranges from mild to severe Etiology Congenital defect in 5th lumbar vertebra, stress fractures, traumatic fractures, bone diseases; it may be associated with and produce lordosis Clinical Low back pain and pain in thighs and buttocks, stiffness, muscle tightness, tenderness in slipped area, paresthesias, sciatica due to nerve root compression

an·te·ro·lis·the·sis

(an'tĕr-ō-lis'thĕ-sis)
Forward displacement of a vertebral body with respect to the vertebral body immediately below it, due to congenital anomaly, degenerative change, or trauma.
Synonym(s): spondylolisthesis.
[antero- + G. olisthēsis, a slipping]

spondylolisthesis

The moving forwards of a vertebra relative to the one under it, most commonly of the 5th lumbar vertebra over the top of the SACRUM. This is due to a congenital weakness (SPONDYLOLYSIS) of the bony arch that bears the facets by which the vertebrae articulate together. Spondylolisthesis causes severe backache on standing and leads to nerve pressure effects. The condition may also affect vertebrae in the neck.