dialogue

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dialogue

[dī′əlog]
Etymology: L, dialogus, philosophic conversation
a complex form of computer-assisted instruction in which the student is actively engaged in "true conversation" with a computer.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although many people are fascinated by language and dialogue, spoken dialogue systems research has only sporadically tapped this enthusiasm.
I discussed with Victor the fact that the spoken dialogue was not that of Jacob Montefiorie who had written the original text.
The fully staged production will be sung in German with English supertitles, but the spoken dialogue will be in English.
The use of ``sprechstimme'' -- spoken dialogue which is almost sung - was pointed in Spoliansky's Society Song.
Even though individuals cannot rely on immediate reactions, as in spoken dialogue, they are nevertheless able to communicate successfully with them.
The narrative, relayed via spoken dialogue and voiceover, concerns Jack/Hudson, a novelist with career-generated marital problems and a fantasy-propelled creative process that shapes his latest potboiler--a moody detective yarn.
The selective capitalizing of certain nouns (such as "Kingdom" and "Heaven") in the film's subtitles also tends to stress a dogmatic dimension that is less emphatic in the spoken dialogue.
Limited to current technology, natural spoken-language systems are likely to respond to fluently spoken dialogue only if it falls within their specialized task domains.
But in France, despite the presence and success of theatres performing Italian and German operas, not to mention the Opera Comique where French operas were interspersed with considerable spoken dialogue, a new and uniquely French operatic tradition was evolving.
French dramatist and theater director who was one of the creators of the opera-comique (French form of opera in which spoken dialogue alternates with self-contained musical numbers).
Since there is no spoken dialogue inThe Knife, David Hare, who is credited with the book and the show's direction, would seem, like Reagan, to have some claim to deniability.
He also distrusted words and spoken dialogue, calling instead for a language of gestures, shapes, light, and movement to express the magical, metaphysical aspect of man -- his concept of " total theatre.