spinal manipulation

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spi·nal ma·nip·u·la·tion

(spī'năl mă-nip'yū-lā'shŭn)
Manual method of osseous movement using high-velocity techniques that take the joint beyond the passive-range end barrier (without exceeding the anatomic limit) to what is known as the paraphysiologic space.
Synonym(s): spinal manipulative therapy.

spinal manipulation

Manipulation of any of the spinal vertebrae, from the neck (the cervical spine) to the lower back (the lumbar spine). The procedure is commonly performed by chiropractors, osteopaths, and massage therapists.
See also: manipulation
References in periodicals archive ?
The 2017 ACP guidelines cite heat therapy, massage, acupuncture and spinal manipulative therapy as alternative methods.
Biomechanical studies of spinal manipulative therapy (SMT): Quantifying the movements of vertebral bodies during SMT.
It is likely that syncope after spinal manipulative therapy is not related to tissue damage and that such adverse event maybe explained by other reasons.
6) General mechanisms and effects of spinal manipulative therapy (Basic science)
Bonello, "A randomized controlled trial of chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy for migraine," Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, vol.
Conversely, people with low back pain presenting with high levels of external locus of control (individual believes that others are responsible for his/her health) would more likely agree with the goals of passive interventions such as spinal manipulative therapy (Braman and Gomez 2004, Hashimoto and Fukuhara 2004).
Spinal manipulative therapy (SMT), a component of osteopathy, has been shown to be variably effective for the treatment of headaches.
Spinal manipulative therapy appears to benefit paediatric mechanical neck pain resulting from day-today activities with no reported serious adverse events.
(2008): Invited Commentary: Spinal Manipulative Therapy for Acute Low Back Pain.