spin echo


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spin ech·o

a commonly used technique to recover T1 and T2 relaxation signals in magnetic resonance imaging, by using a 180° inverting pulse in the pulse sequence to compensate for loss of transverse magnetization caused by magnetic field inhomogeneities.

spin echo

An MRI term for the reappearance of NMR signal after the free induction decay (FID) ends, caused by reversal (rephasing) of the dephasing spins by specific RF pulse sequences or pairs of field gradient pulses, applied in time shorter than or on the order of T2.
Proper selection of the echo time of the pulse sequence can help control the amount of T1 or T2 contrast present in the image.

spin echo

(spin ek'ō)
A commonly used technique to recover T2 relaxation signals in magnetic resonance imaging, by using a 180-degree inverting pulse in the pulse sequence to compensate for loss of transverse magnetization caused by magnetic field inhomogeneities.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is a spin echo sequence also referred to as black blood imaging.
MRI showed that the osteolytic mass filling the proximal femur was hypointense on spin echo T1-weighted images, and slightly hyperintense on spin echo T2-weighted images, which represented a few small bright foci.
Diffusion weighted MRI was performed by a single-shot spin echo (SE) echo planar imaging (EPI) sequence using b-values of 0, 500, and 1000.
The parameters used for the patients were as follows: Turbospin echo T1 and T2 weighted sequences on the axial plane, turbospin echo fat-saturated T2 weighted sequence on the coronal plane, turbospin echo T2 weighted sequence on the sagittal plane, spin echo fat-saturated T1 sequences repeated on the axial and coronal planes followed by intravenous administration of gadolinium.
Results: Conventional spin echo and fast spin echo were equivalent for the tissues of comparable signal intensities and for entities moderate difference between signal intensities.
Pancreatic duct: MR cholangiopancreatography with a three-dimensional fast spin echo technique.
Parameters were as follows: transverse view T1 Weighted Image (T1WI) (time of repetition (TE): 300 ~ 500 ms; time of echo (TE): 8 ~ 12 ms), Fast Spin Echo (FSE) (TR: 2500 ~ 5000 ms; TE 90 ~ 102 ms), fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) (TR: 8002 ms; TE: 104 ms), echo-planar imaging - diffusion weighted imaging (EPI-DWI) (TR: 7100 ms; TE: 129 ms); sagittal view spin echo T1WI (TR: 300 ~ 500 ms; TE: 8 ~ 12 ms); coronal view FSE T2WI (TR: 2500 ~ 5000 ms; TE: 90 ~ 102 ms).
The following sequences were performed and reviewed: Proton Density (PD) sequences in coronal, sagittal, and axial cuts, Proton Density (PD) Fast Spin Echo (FSE) sequence in coronal cuts, and T2-weighted Fast Spin Echo (FSE) with fat suppression (FS) in sagittal cuts.
The study was continued with computed tomography with contrast and obtainment in portal phase, and after a complementary magnetic resonance (MR) with axial and coronal T2 weighted single-shot turbo spin echo, MR Cholangiopancreatography and contrast enhancement sequences were performed.
It has also been reported that lower iron accumulation is better demonstrated in gradient echo sequences, whereas iron overload is better visualized in spin echo sequences.
Diffuse axonal injury-related brain lesions are mainly hemorrhagic which are well recognized by this technique (7), (8) In the acute and subacute phase of hemorrhagic lesions, the existence of paramagnetic materials such as methemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, hemosiderin, generates signal intensity in T2GE (9) while in spin echo imaging selective T2 relaxation enhancement of deoxyhemoglobin is related to time varying magnetic field (10).