spherocytosis

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Related to Spherocytes: Heinz bodies, target cells

spherocytosis

 [sfe″ro-si-to´sis]
the presence of spherocytes in the blood.
hereditary spherocytosis a congenital hereditary form of hemolytic anemia characterized by spherocytosis, abnormal fragility of erythrocytes, jaundice, and splenomegaly.

sphe·ro·cy·to·sis

(sfē'rō-sī-tō'sis),
Presence of spheric red blood cells in the blood.
Synonym(s): microspherocytosis
[spherocyte + G. -osis, condition]

spherocytosis

/sphe·ro·cy·to·sis/ (sfēr″o-si-to´sis) the presence of spherocytes in the blood.
hereditary spherocytosis  a congenital hereditary form of hemolytic anemia characterized by spherocytosis, abnormal fragility of erythrocytes, jaundice, and splenomegaly.

spherocytosis

[sfir′ōsītō′sis]
the abnormal presence of spherocytes in the blood. Compare elliptocytosis.
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Spherocytosis

spherocytosis

Congenital spherocytic anemia, congenital spherocytosis, hereditary spherocytosis, spherocytic anemia Hematology A rare–1:5000 AD condition characterized by chronic hemolytic anemia with ↑ osmotic fragility and autohemolysis of globose RBC due to various defects in RBC membrane proteins Clinical Infants may be jaundiced; other Sx may be seen in older Pts fatigue, weakness, SOB, anemia, intermittent jaundice, splenomegaly, gallstones, leg ulcers Management Splenectomy. Cf Elliptocytosis.

sphe·ro·cy·to·sis

(sfēr'ō-sī-tō'sis)
Presence of spherelike red blood cells in the blood.
[spherocyte + G. -osis, condition]

spherocytosis

A blood disorder in which the red cells are unusually small and spherical. In hereditary spherocytosis the red cells are fragile and burst easily, causing ANAEMIA.

sphe·ro·cy·to·sis

(sfēr'ō-sī-tō'sis)
Presence of spheric red blood cells in blood.
[spherocyte + G. -osis, condition]

spherocytosis

the presence of spherocytes in the blood.
References in periodicals archive ?
2000), we found that echinocytes can be further progressed into spherocytes (Figure 1A) by prolonged exposure to [Hg.
The microcytic hypochromic red cells of [beta]TT and spherocytes of HS had opposite properties with regards to their fragility and this probably leads to reduced severity of hemolysis.
Notably, the presence of spherocytes (hemolysis), teardrop cells (myelofibrosis, bone marrow metastases), or sickle cells (sickle-cell anemia), as examples, give information beyond that of the standard indices.
The red cell morphology showed anisocytosis, poikilocytosis with occasional teardrop cells, spherocytes, ovalocytes, and a few schistocytes.
Blood smear examination showed marked RBC agglutination, few spherocytes, neutropenia with an absolute neutrophil count (ANC) of 50/[micro]L, and Wuchereria bancrofti microfilariae (Figure 1a).
So large, flat erythrocytes as seen in thalassemia will slowly "parachute" down while spherocytes will fall faster than normally shaped erythrocytes.
In the interest of simplifying reports and eliminating redundant information given to clinicians, some laboratories have moved to eliminating the non-specific term poikilocytosis and reporting only the specific type of abnormal RBC forms, (2) such as spherocytes, acanthocytes, and teardrops.
Q Our lab currently examines blood smears and reports the term poikilocytosis in addition to the individual terms of spherocyte, acanthocyte, and the like.
Cell dehydration of spherocytes in an HS patient is one of the causes of normal osmotic fragility test.
A complicating autoimmune hemolytic anemia may also be evident on the peripheral smear with anemia, numerous spherocytes, and polychromasia.
Autoimmune hemolysis ([greater than or equal to]5% spherocytes, except newborn and hyposplenic)