spur

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spur

 [sper]
1. a spiked object or goad.
2. a projecting body, as from a bone; called also calcar.
Calcaneal (heel) spur. From Frazier et al., 2000.

cal·car

(kal'kar), [TA]
1. A small projection from any structure; internal spurs (septa) at the level of division of arteries and confluence of veins when branches or roots form an acute angle.
See also: vascular spur.
2. A dull spine or projection from a bone.
Synonym(s): spur [TA]
[L. spur, cock's spur]

spur

(spur)
1. calcar; a spiked projecting body, as from a bone.
2. in dentistry, a piece of metal projecting from a plate, band, or other appliance.

calcaneal spur  a bone excrescence on the lower surface of the calcaneus which frequently causes pain on walking.
scleral spur  the posterior lip of the venous sinus of the sclera to which most of the fibers of the trabecular reticulum of the iridocorneal angle and the meridional fibers of the ciliary muscle are attached.

spur

(spûr)
n.
A spine or projection from a bone.

spur

Etymology: AS, spura
a projection of bone from a body structure or of metal from an appliance. See also exostosis.

spur

Orthopedics A bony projection often arising in a calcified tendon. See Calcaneal spur.

cal·car

(kal'kahr) [TA]
1. A small projection from any structure; internal spurs (septa) at the level of division of arteries and confluence of veins when branches or roots form an acute angle.
2. A spine or projection from a bone.
Synonym(s): spur.
[L. spur, rooster's spur]

spur

  1. a short shoot on which flowers are borne.
  2. an extension of a leafbase below its point of attachment to the petiole.
  3. a hollow, conical projection from the base of a petal, as in the larkspur.

Spur

Any projection from a bone.
Mentioned in: Rotator Cuff Injury

spur

1. an abnormal projecting body, as from a bone.
2. a piece of riding gear worn on the heel of a horserider's boot and used to urge on a horse to a faster speed by digging the spur into the flank.
3. a sharp, horn-covered, bony projection from the shank of male birds of some species. Used as a weapon. Called also metatarsal spur.
4. tracheal spur, the ridge of tracheal cartilage that separates the beginning of the right bronchus from the beginnings of the left one.

spur veins
subcutaneous veins visible over the ventral part of the chest of a horse (superficial thoracic vein). Subject to laceration by indiscriminate use of sharp spurs by the vigorous rider.
References in periodicals archive ?
And Polzin, Durkin and Spere insist on personally meeting every new client.
It's a refrain that has been passed down through Polzin, Durkin and Spere and included in employee evaluations.
SPERE Executive vice president, secretary, general counsel Age: 46
However, Speres quickly discovered that success in China would require a product developed to meet the needs of its Chinese customers.
In 2005, Speres set up a production subsidiary supported by an R&D lab in China, motivated by strong strategic considerations, including the need to serve existing Western customers with production facilities in China and explore opportunities in the Chinese domestic market.
However, when it became clear that Speres needed to create a product specifically for the Chinese market, the subsidiary and its lab were asked to provide Speres headquarters in Italy with specifications for a product specifically targeting the Chinese market.
A detailed investigation by Speres China's management team revealed that the company's standard technological platforms, which it had simply transplanted from Italy, were not suitable for the local market, which had different technological needs and a stronger price focus.
Mario Rossi, Speres China's general manager, analyzed the products of Chinese competitors, even visiting some companies, to learn the "secret recipe" for electronic controllers for industrial air conditioning and refrigeration systems that would attract Chinese customers.
Chinese companies used a unipolar electronic expansion valve that offers limited thermodynamic performance but requires only a very simple electronic control, as opposed to the complex control systems needed by the bipolar valves used by Speres and other Western companies.
Speres China lacked some key competencies to compete well in this market.
In order for Speres China to compete with Chinese companies, the management team realized, it would have to make some technical changes in its products.
As Rossi pointed out, the new product specifications challenged not only the culture of Speres but also the technological trajectories that had been followed by the European and American markets up to that point.