hypersonic

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hy·per·son·ic

(hī'pĕr-son'ik),
Pertaining to or characterized by supersonic speeds of Mach 5 or greater. Although any speed above the speed of sound may be referred to as supersonic, speeds of Mach 5 or greater are specifically referred to as hypersonic.
[hyper- + L. sonus, sound]
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References in periodicals archive ?
What is the theoretical value of the speed of sound at your room temperature?
When a jet exceeds the speed of sound, the air around it produces a noise like thunder, called a sonic boom.
Little data was available for theoretical speed of sound at 9,000 psig.
357 Mag rounds produced velocities sonic -- above the speed of sound.
Then, in October 1997, he led a team that broke the speed of sound.
Subsonic simply means that the projectile is traveling below the speed of sound.
Since the invention of the airplane (see 1903), planes had been going faster and faster, but propellers can only whirl so fast and it seemed that the speed limit for planes was bound to be less than the speed of sound, which is about 740 miles per hour.
A week after the Challenger exploded in 1986, Ronald Reagan introduced the country to the hydrogen-powered National Aero-Space Plane (NASP), "a new Orient Express that could, by the end of the next decade, take off from Dulles Airport and accelerate up to 25 times the speed of sound, attaining low Earth orbit or flying to Tokyo within two hours.
in meters per second where: C = Speed of sound in feet per second T = Temperature in degrees Fahrenheit [C.
Thirty-two megajule is equivalent to a firing speed of Mach 8 or eight times the speed of sound.
Engineers at the company's "Skunk Works" base in California say they will be able to construct the SR-72 jet after solving a problem which has long hindered attempts to build planes capable of flying at more than twice the speed of sound.
According to the Daily Mail, after jumping from 128,100 feet above the Earth, Felix Baumgartner broke the speed of sound after 34 seconds of free fall, ultimately accelerating to as high as 833.