specimen

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specimen

 [spes´ĭ-men]
a small sample or part taken to show the nature of the whole, such as a small quantity of urine for urinalysis or a small fragment of tissue for microscopic study.
clean-catch specimen (clean-voided specimen) a urine specimen obtained after the external urethral area is washed with a liquid soap and rinsed well; then the patient starts a urinary stream, stops it, and voids into a sterile specimen container. The purpose of obtaining such a specimen is to minimize contamination by external organisms. Called also midstream specimen.
midstream specimen clean-catch specimen.
sputum specimen a sample of mucous secretion from the bronchi and lungs; see also sputum specimen.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

spec·i·men

(spes'ĭ-mĕn), Avoid the misspelling speciman.
A small part, or sample, of any substance or material obtained for testing.
[L. fr. specio, to look at]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

specimen

(spĕs′ə-mən)
n.
1. An individual, item, or part representative of a class or whole.
2. An organism, part of an organism, or fossil that has been collected and usually preserved, especially for display or scientific research.
3. A sample, as of tissue, blood, or urine, used for analysis and diagnosis.
4. Informal An individual; a person: a disagreeable specimen.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

specimen

A small sample of something–cells, organ, organism, plasma, tissue, whatever, that represents a whole, from which a diagnosis is rendered or other determination of said object's nature is made. See Fasting specimen, Fingerstick specimen, Frozen specimen, Rejected specimen.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

spec·i·men

(spes'i-mĕn)
A small part or sample of any substance or material obtained for testing.
[L. fr. specio, to look at]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

specimen

a whole or part of an organism used as an example or illustration.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Gone but not forgotten: the search for the lost surgical specimens: application of quality improvement techniques in reducing medical error.
The produced soilcrete specimens were made as cylinders of 35 mm in diameter and 70 mm in height (LST EN 12716:2003).
In addition, the acquired specimen bank includes ductal lavage specimens collected at 16 centres in the US, one in the UK as well as blood and urine specimens, for a total of approximately 40,000 samples, said the company.
To ensure maximum accuracy of results proper patient preparation, specimen collection and handling are necessary.
where P is the maximum load, L is the length of support span, and W and T are the width and the thickness of the specimens, respectively.
There are a large number of steps in the medical laboratory evaluation of human tissue specimens, many of which can lead to a misidentification error and subsequent misdiagnosis.
In this research, a total of nine dog-bone steel specimens were prepared and tested through using different specimen preparation methods and correlation image photogrammetry.
Unfortunately, not all specimens are collected by phlebotomists.
To investigate the influence of specimen geometry, surface-to-volume (S/V) ratio exposed to drying, the ring test procedure (i.e., DEMEC (DEmountable MEChanical) gage point locations), and surface sealing (axial versus radial drying) on free shrinkage, both prismatic (linear) and ring specimens were prepared.
The study of the states of the concrete specimens with different aspect ratios under stress and failure test.
Objectives: To determine the frequency of incidentally diagnosed carcinoma prostate in prostatic specimens removed by transurethral approach for benign prostatic hyperplasia.
This guide is to help nurses, physicians and, and other medical personnel in selecting, collecting, preserving, and transporting specimens for clinical microbiological analysis.