disability

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disability

 [dis″ah-bil´ĭ-te]
1. impairment of function to below the maximal level, either physically or mentally.
2. anything that causes such impairment.
3. the United States Government defines a disability as “a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more of an individual's major life activities:” this includes both those individuals with a record of an impairment and those regarded as having such an impairment.
4. the World Health Organization defines disability as loss of function at the level of the whole person, which may include inability to communicate or to perform mobility, activities of daily living, or necessary vocational or avocational activities; rehabilitation is aimed at teaching patients to remediate or compensate and thus maximize functional independence. See also handicap and impairment.
developmental disability a substantial handicap in mental or physical functioning, with onset before the age of 18 and of indefinite duration. Examples are autism, cerebral palsy, uncontrolled epilepsy, certain other neuropathies, and mental retardation.

dis·a·bil·i·ty

(dis'ă-bil'i-tē),
1. According to the International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities and Handicaps (World Health Organization), any restriction or lack of ability to perform an activity in a manner or within the range considered normal for a human being. The term disability reflects the consequences of impairment in terms of functional performance and activity by the person; disabilities thus represent disturbances at the individual level.
2. An impairment or defect of one or more organs or members.

disability

/dis·a·bil·i·ty/ (dis″ah-bil´it-e)
1. inability to function normally, physically or mentally; incapacity.
2. anything that causes disability.
3. as defined by the federal government: “inability to engage in any substantial gainful activity by reason of any medically determinable physical or mental impairment which can be expected to last or has lasted for a continuous period of not less than 12 months.”

developmental disability  a substantial handicap of indefinite duration, with onset before the age of 18 years, such as mental retardation, autism, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, or other neuropathy.

disability

(dĭs′ə-bĭl′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. disabili·ties
1.
a. A physical or mental condition that significantly limits a person's motor, sensory, or cognitive abilities.
b. The state of having such a condition. discrimination based on disability.
2.
a. A program that provides financial support to people with such conditions: has been on disability for a month.
b. The economic assistance provided by such a program: has been getting disability since the accident.
3. Law Lack of legal capacity to perform some act, such as to enter into a contract, because of infancy or lack of soundness of mind.

disability

[dis′əbil′itē]
Etymology: L, dis, opposite of, habilis, fit
the loss, absence, or impairment of physical or mental fitness. Compare handicapped.

disability

Occupational medicine An inability to work because of physical or mental impairment, which precludes performing expected roles or tasks Degree Partial–some types of labor can be performed; total–degree of impairment precludes any type of gainful employment; disability is affected by various factors, including age, education, economic and social environments Social medicine Handicap A limitation in a person's mental or physical ability to function in terms of work, learning or other socially required or relevant activities, to the extent that the person might be regarded as having a need for certain benefits, compensation, exemptions, special training because of said limitations Examples Impaired hearing, mobility, speech, vision, infection with TB, HIV, or etc, malignancy, past Hx of alcohol or drug abuse, mental illness. See Ambulatory disability, Americans with Disabilities Act, Handicap, Learning disability, Reading disability, Reversible ischemic neurologic, Political correctness, Serious emotional or behavioral disability/disorder, Temporary partial disability, Temporary total disability. Cf Impairment.

dis·a·bil·i·ty

(dis'ă-bil'i-tē)
1. Diminished capacity to perform a physical or mental function within a prescribed range.
2. An impairment or defect of one or more organs or members.
See also: handicap

disability

A term whose definition has been much debated. The current UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities reads: ‘Persons with disabilities include those who have long-term physical, mental, intellectual or sensory impairments which in interaction with various barriers may hinder their full and active participation in society on an equal basis with others.’ A definition proposed in 2006, subject to WHO approval is: ‘Difficulty in functioning at the body, person or societal levels, in one or more life domains, as experienced by an individual with a health condition in interaction with contextual factors.’

disability

inability to participate in activity at a standard level.

disability,

n according to the World Health Organization (WHO) rehabilitation guidelines, impairment of an individual as it affects his or her role in life, such as an inability to work because of a health condition.

dis·a·bil·i·ty

(dis'ă-bil'i-tē)
According to the International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities and Handicaps (World Health Organization), any restriction or lack of ability to perform an activity in a manner or within the range considered normal for a human being.

disability,

n the inability to function in the normal or usual manner; examples of an outcome measure are days missing from work or lessened productivity.
disability,
denial of,
n a symptom in which patients deny the existence of a disease or disability. Denial by these patients is a nonrealistic attempt to maintain their predisease status. These patients regard ill health and disability as an imperfection, a weakness, and even a disgrace.

disability

1. inability to function normally, physically or mentally; incapacity.
2. anything that causes disability.

Patient discussion about disability

Q. Is it true that fibromyalgia is a disability? I haven't worked long enough to draw my regular social security, the fibromyalgia i have had since 1996 keeps me from working, so why can't i get ssi and some health insurance please help me.

A. Fibromyalgia is a relatively new term in the medical world, which primarily is defined by muscle and tissue pain and the etiology, or reason is unknown. Also, sufferers react to pain with a light touch often. Other symptoms include stiff joints and insomnia.

Fibromyalgia is considered a symptom, as this is when a set of symptoms occur together without known cause. A disability, however, is a physical defect or illness that is clearly defined.

Fibromyalgia shares symptoms of those who have a high degree of stress and/or anxiety, so this has been suggested as the cause as well. These links that follow might help more:

About.com: Fibromyalgia - News, information, and support for sufferers of fibromyalgia.
Arthritis Insight-Fibromyalgia - Definition, the symptoms, and how is it diagnosed and treated.
Autonomic (Sympathetic) Nervous System Dysfunction in Fibromyalgia - Fibromyalgia symptoms can be explained by autonomic (sympathetic) nervous system dysfunction
Diagnosis a

Q. What kind of job would suit a person with a disability like arthritis? My Dad is settled in USA, and he suffers from Rheumatoid Arthritis. Can anyone suggest me a job which he can take up, which he can do, without too much of physical work? He is well educated and was a teacher in India, but he is waiting for his certificates to get to USA, to apply for teaching positions.

A. Assuming you don't consider teaching in a classroom too much physical work, he should probably wait for his teaching certificates to clear and then work as a teacher. I meas, why do you feel he should change his career?

Q. Could ADHD be the reason my nine year old can not read or tell the difference between 16 and 60? My nine year old can not read or remember how to spell little words like as and on. She also has major problems with complicated sorting that other child younger then her can do. The school says it is because she is not on medication for her ADHD. She has a younger sister who has ADHD and is not on medication and she is doing well in school. Can ADHD cause all her problems or is there something else going on.

A. I have a 13-year-old child who has ADHD along with learning disabilities including an auditory processing disorder and a working memory disorder (diagnosed in 2nd grade). Not sure if the attention symptoms are because of the learning disabilities, etc. LD goes hand in hand with ADHD and vice verse. A very high percentage of people who have ADHD also have something else going on such as learning disabilities, oppositional defiance disorder, bipolar disorder, etc. My child is 13 now and has always exhibited signs of ADHD, LD and ODD. You should have your child tested at the school level for learning disabilities. Write a letter requesting testing for learning disabilities and give it to your school's principal. The school then has I believe 30 days to respond with testing.This will let you know if your child also has a learning disability going on with the ADHD. It also gives you the option of allowing your child to receive Special Education services in a resource class.

More discussions about disability
References in periodicals archive ?
Addressing the ceremony, EDO CD Saleem Qureshi said the provincial government had decided to build separate parks for special people at big cities keeping in view their requirements.
She said it was not an easy procedure because special people had to take disability certificates from the social welfare office and a large number of people did not have identification cards due to accessibility issues.
It has been learnt that the social welfare officer Aalamgir Khan and KMT General Secretary Fazal Dad held a meeting and discussed all the aspects of financial assistances to be given to the special people according to the provincial government's adopted policy.
Having had so many calls about other opportunities for the disabled cast of Special People, the former Plantsbrook pupil who got a first-class degree after leaving school with no O-levels says he is beginning to feel like a casting director.
SHIBERGHAN (PAN): Dozens of special people and family members of martyrs, pressing for their due rights as guaranteed in the constitution, Tuesday staged a demonstration in Shiberghan, capital of the northern Jawzjan province.
For the fifth year, the Echo Community Champion Awards will be recognising and rewarding special people whose tireless work for others often goes unnoticed.
The founders of TeleFlip believe that all of America will be "teleflipping" before long and using this new tool to stay in close contact with the special people in their lives with a simplicity and affordability never before possible.
LAHORE -- Provincial Minister for Special Education Asif Saeed Manhais on Wednesday said, for the welfare of special people, the government would set up more institutions for education and training of special children.
He was at a conference here on Monday held on the UN convention to highlight rights of special people.
Cllr Ron Round, Leader of Knowsley Council, commented: "We have a strong community spirit here in Knowsley and it's great to be able to recognise and say thank you to those special people in the borough.
Below are recent gifts to SIECUS for the period of February 2012-August 2012 from special people to special people.
THE Rotary Club of Warwick is looking for special people who have made a real difference to their community.

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