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Spanish

Ethnicity The language spoken by 40 million US inhabitants; Hispanics have surpassed African Americans as the largest minority in the US Primary care providers, especially those practicing in large urban areas, are increasingly obliged to become passably fluent in Spanish to be able to best care for their Pts. See Hispanic, Medical Spanish.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
I want to suggest that Spanishness can be read between the lines as Gothicness.
A4v), thus complicating and ironizing his humorous insistence on the extreme "forraine" nature, and decided Spanishness, of sack, which at one point he calls "this Iberian, Castilian, Canarian, Sherrian, Mallaganian, Robolonian, Robdanian ..." (sig.
While being careful not to transpose Goode's argument about Spanish modern notions of race or Castro's concept of medieval convivencia directly onto the contemporary situation of Ceuta, understanding the central role that notions of tolerance, convivencia, and inclusion played in the construction of the historical narratives of Spanishness is essential for analyzing the way convivencia works in Ceuta.
Therefore, "historical Flanders" is still rooted in the imperial sense of Spanishness, particularly in the Madrid-based newspapers, a concept with considerable potential at a moment when Spain was undergoing a huge financial and political crisis.
The symbolic negative dimension frame of the debates was dominated by the "breakup" metaphor and by the assertion of the Britishness and the Spanishness of Scotland and Catalonia, respectively.
(2) The concepts of nation and identity are a burning topic in Spain today, and the presence of North African Muslim immigrants has prompted the questioning of the idea of Spanishness from a new perspective.
In fact, it still permeates the staging of a defensive reaction toward the foreign: its perceived thread is answered with a return to old discourses of "Spanishness" and centralist nationalism" (38).
However, "Spanishness" and "Catholicness" represent much more than a mere defense of a state policy or an outdated conception of the world.
(2) The idea of "Spanishness" or "Hispanidad," according to the Franco regime, involved the affirmation of Spanish history as an imperial power, as well as an exaltation of Catholic values.
In the collective imagination of the Latin American, there are a number of values attributed to "European-ness" represented in "Spanishness," high esteem, trust, and credibility.
Which members of the society (children, elderly, shopkeepers, leaders, followers, men, women, Christians, Moors, Castilians, Basques, etc.) were most representative of "Spanishness" in Hemingway's mind?