Spanish influenza

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Span·ish in·flu·en·za

influenza that caused several waves of pandemic in 1918-1919, resulting in more than 20 million deaths worldwide; it was particularly severe in Spain (hence the name), but now is thought to have originated in the U.S. as a form of swine influenza.

Span·ish in·flu·en·za

(span'ish in'flū-en'ză)
Disease that precipitated several waves of pandemic infection during 1918 and 1919 and resulted in more than 20 million deaths worldwide. It was caused by influenza virus A; phylogenetic analysis indicates that this strain is related to subsequently observed type A human and classic swine influenzaviruses.
References in periodicals archive ?
Experts agree Spanish flu, caused by the H1N1 strain, was the deadliest disease in history, but there are conflicting theories about how it began.
In this published study, Inovio report on a synthetic micro-consensus approach that relies on a small collection of 4 synthetic H1HA DNA antigens which delivered in a single dose generated broadly protective antibody immune responses against several major deadly strains of H1N1 flu viruses from the last 100 years including the strain that caused the 1918 Spanish Flu (which killed over 40 million people) in mice, guinea pigs and non-human primates.
SPANISH FLU In 1918 brave soldiers made their way home from the front following four years of deadly conflict in France, Flanders and beyond.
Until fairly recently, historians paid the Spanish Flu surprisingly little attention: perhaps, Spinney suggests, because 'pandemic memory' takes a long time to mature.
The Spanish flu pandemic, which killed at least 50 million people, has remained something of an enigma, not only because scientists are still unsure about why it was so lethal, but because it's a hugely significant world event that for decades seemed to have been largely forgotten.
Even today, reinsurers still talk about a "pandemic similar to the Spanish flu pandemic" as an example of the kind of health catastrophe that a life insurer or health insurer must be prepared to handle.
As the deadly Spanish flu hits, and members of the household fall ill, Meredith struggles to cope with responsibilities beyond her years.
Michael Osterholm's larger point is that even if H5N1 is afar less deadly virus than WHO numbers suggest it is, if it were to become a pandemic it could kill millions more people than the 1918 Spanish flu did.
The 1918 Spanish Flu pandemic killed up to 40 million people, more than the number who died in the First World War.
THE new film Contagion brings the World War One Spanish flu epidemic to mind.
London, Sept 27(ANI): UT Southwestern Medical Center investigators have tested a compound that destroys several viruses, including the deadly Spanish flu that killed an estimated 30 million people in the worldwide pandemic of 1918.
Each chapter focuses on a different kind of infection, from Swine Flu to the Spanish Flu to all manner of food borne illness.