Spanish influenza

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Span·ish in·flu·en·za

influenza that caused several waves of pandemic in 1918-1919, resulting in more than 20 million deaths worldwide; it was particularly severe in Spain (hence the name), but now is thought to have originated in the U.S. as a form of swine influenza.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Span·ish in·flu·en·za

(span'ish in'flū-en'ză)
Disease that precipitated several waves of pandemic infection during 1918 and 1919 and resulted in more than 20 million deaths worldwide. It was caused by influenza virus A; phylogenetic analysis indicates that this strain is related to subsequently observed type A human and classic swine influenzaviruses.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
It is often overlooked that, while the war killed 17 million, Spanish flu accounted for 50 million deaths -3% of the world's population - including 250,000 Britons.
A hundred years ago, Spanish flu killed more -- many millions more -- than those who died in the fighting in the trenches on the Eastern and Western fronts.
"Spanish Flu: Nursing During History's Deadliest Pandemic" explores the devastating impact of the Spanish flu 100 years ago, and the role of both professional nurses in military field hospitals and ordinary women at home in caring for victims.
Soon, the influenza became known as the "Spanish Lady" or "Spanish flu."
Combining epidemiology, anthropology, and meticulously researched evidence, Spinney documents the so-called Spanish flu, underscoring the impact the disease had on the world as it was in the early twentieth century, and how that has influenced and shaped modern history and science.
The former Blue Peter host said he keeps thinking about the worldwide Spanish Flu epidemic of 1918, adding: "Of course, you think, in 1918 you can die from the flu.
Throughout the world, the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic infected one-third of all humans and claimed an estimated 50 to 100 million lives.
Inovio announced before the market opened that its synthetic vaccine approach using a collection of synthetic DNA antigens generated broad protective antibody responses against all major deadly strains of H1 influenza viruses from the last 100 years including the virus that caused "Spanish Flu" in 1918 in multiple animal models including mice, guinea pigs and non-human primates.
As Britain battles the current winter flu outbreak, MARION MCMULLEN looks at the devastation caused by Spanish flu 100 years ago HE most devastating outbreak of disease in modern times arrived in January, 1918.