spallation

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spal·la·tion

(spaw-lā'shŭn),
1. Synonym(s): fragmentation
2. Nuclear reaction in which nuclei, on being bombarded by high energy particles, liberate a number of protons and alpha particles.
[M.E. spalle, fragment]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

spal·la·tion

(spaw-lā'shŭn)
1. Synonym(s): fragmentation.
2. Nuclear reaction in which nuclei, on being bombarded by high-energy particles, liberate a number of protons and alpha particles.
[M.E. spalle, fragment]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

spallation

(spo-lā′shŏn)
1. The process of breaking into very small parts. The term may be applied to visible structures or to atomic particles.
2. The release of inert particles into the bloodstream. The splintering of bits of plastic from the pump used in hemodialysis is an example.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
[9, 10] At a spallation source, fitting the transmission vs wavelength allows extraction of the neutron polarization.
These attributes are relevant to all neutron sources, but are particularly well-matched to time of flight analysis at spallation sources. There are several issues in the practical use of [.sup.3]He spin filters for slow neutron physics.
Good resolution and high flux at long d-spacings can be achieved on diffractometers with back-scattering geometry using cold neutron pulses, such as the IRIS and OSIRIS instruments at the ISIS spallation source. Low angle detectors on instruments utilising thermal neutron pulses can also be used, although the [DELTA]d/d resolution is generally lower.
For spallation sources, non-fissile nuclei of mass number A > 100 emerge as appropriate targets [13].
The strongly spin-dependent absorption of neutrons in nuclear spin-polarized [.sup.3]He opens up the possibility of polarizing neutrons from reactors and spallation sources over the full kinematical range of cold, thermal and hot neutrons.