Spallanzani


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Related to Spallanzani: Francesco Redi, John Needham

Spal·lan·za·ni

(spahl-ahn-zahn'ē),
Lazaro, Italian priest and scientist, 1729-1799. See: Spallanzani law.
References in periodicals archive ?
(7.) The inventory of the Acquaviva library has been pointed out by Spallanzani (1992) and Luise (2006).
The Spallanzani hospital is a centre of excellence on a European level," she said.
SPALLANZANI (ed.), Produzione, commercio e consumo dei panni di lana nei secoli XII-XVIII, Florencia, 1976.
He went first to Sicily and then to Rome aboard a C-130 transport plane and was taken immediately to the capital's Spallanzani hospital, which specializes in infectious diseases.
(3) Department of Biology and Biotechnology "Lazzaro Spallanzani," University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia, Italy
The 18th-century Italian scientist Lazzaro Spallanzani hypothesized that bats navigate by sound and not sight, but not until the 1930s did humans develop the technology to "hear" bat calls, and only lately have we been able to begin interpreting those calls.
El ultrasonido se descubrio en 1794, con Lazzaro Spallanzani, cuando observo que al tapar las orejas de los murcielagos, estos perdian su capacidad de orientacion.
In winter the highest value was due to the presence of the polychaete Spirographis spallanzani (with approximately 50 g each individual) and numerous and/or large ophiuroids as Hemipholis elongata, Amphiodia atra and Ophioderma januarii.
Podian saber mas acerca de la anatomia de los animales, como los experimentos realizados por Spallanzani sobre su proceso digestivo (69).
E dramaturga e roteirista; e tambem conhecida no Brasil por ter adaptado o romance do escritor brasileiro Rubem Fonseca, Bufo & Spallanzani para o cinema.
For instance, until the late 18th-century and Lazaro Spallanzani's discovery of echolocation, there had been no significant scientific theory or understanding of how bats nagivate in the dark, making it practically impossible for scientists and humanists to attempt to answer Nagel's titular question.
From the Department of Comparative Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Teramo, Piazza Aldo, Moro 45, 64100, Teramo, Italy (Marruchella, Todisco, Di Guardo); and the National Institute for Infectious Diseases "Lazzaro Spallanzani," Molecular Microbiology, Via Portuense 292, 00149, Rome, Italy (D'Arezzo, Paglia).