probe

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probe

 [prōb]
1. a long, slender instrument for exploring wounds, body cavities, passages, or periodontal pockets.
Dental probes are marked in millimeters to measure the depth of periodontal pockets. From Novak, 2001.
2. a radioactive or chemiluminescent DNA or RNA fragment used to detect the presence of a complementary fragment. The labeled sequence is added to a specimen, where it forms a complex with the DNA in the sample, which has previously been treated to separate the DNA into single strands. DNA probes are used clinically to detect and identify infectious disease agents.
root canal probe in root canal therapy, an instrument for tracing the course of the root canal. Called also pathfinder, pathfinder broach, and smooth broach.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

probe

(prōb),
1. A slender rod of rigid or flexible material, with a blunt bulbous tip, used for exploring sinuses, fistulae, other cavities, or wounds.
2. A device or agent used to detect or explore a substance (for example, a molecule used to detect the presence of a specific fragment of DNA or RNA or of a specific bacterial colony).
3. To enter and explore, as with a probe.
[L. probo, to test]

(Sense 2) Probes are essential tools for DNA analysis. Every DNA molecule possesses some unique nucleotide sequences that differentiate it from all others. A probe is a relatively short fabricated fragment of DNA that matches, in lock-and-key fashion, a nucleotide sequence unique to the material that is being sought. Probes are used to test for the presence of cloned genes in bacterial or yeast colonies, for specific nucleotide sequences in samples of DNA, or for specific genes on chromosomes.

Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

probe

(prōb)
n.
1. A slender flexible surgical instrument with a blunt bulbous tip, used to explore a wound or body cavity.
2. The act of exploring or searching with a device or instrument.
3. A substance, such as DNA, that is radioactively labeled or otherwise marked and used to detect or identify another substance in a sample.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

probe

Surgery Explorer A long, thin, usually metal instrument with a blunt or bulbous tip which is used to poke around in cavities, fistulae, sinuses, and wounds
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

probe

(prōb)
1. A slender rod of flexible material, with blunt bulbous tip, used for exploring sinuses, fistulae, other cavities, or wounds.
2. A device or agent used to detect or explore a substance, e.g., a molecule used to detect the presence of a specific fragment of DNA or RNA or of a specific bacterial colony.
3. To enter and explore, as with a probe.
[L. probo, to test]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

probe

Any slender, usually blunt-ended instrument used to explore a passageway, cavity or wound.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

probe

  1. a defined NUCLEIC ACID MOLECULE that can be used in MOLECULAR HYBRIDIZATION procedures to identify specific nucleic acid sequences that are complementary to it, by virtue of a LABEL generally carried by the probe. The label may be radioactive and detected by an AUTORADIO GRAPH, or non-radioactive, such as a fluorochrome, which could be detected by FLUORESCENCE. Under the right conditions the probe will hybridize only with a perfectly matching nucleic acid target molecule. The hybrid thus formed can then be detected by the appropriate method, depending upon the label on the probe. The probe may be DNA, RNA or a synthetic OLIGONUCLEOTIDE. Nucleic acid probes have a wide range of applications, such as in the detection of MICROORGANISMS in clinical specimens, in food and water samples, in the detection of genetic DISEASES (see RFLPs and in the identification of individuals (see FINGERPRINTING).
  2. a labelled molecule, such as a MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY, that can bind to a specific PROTEIN being searched for. The label permits detection.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

probe

(prōb)
A slender rod of rigid or flexible material, with a blunt bulbous tip, used for exploring sinuses, fistulae, or wounds.
[L. probo, to test]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Interestingly, Voyager 1 has passed the Pioneer 10 space probe and is now the most distant human-made object in space.
The Galileo space probe was launched on October 19 amid controversy over its highly toxic payload of 49.25 pounds of plutonium, which provides heat and electricity for its instruments [see Grossman and Long, "Nuclear Slingshot," October 2].
Despite that disaster, however, and despite continuing problems with the shuttle booster rockets, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration plans to launch two space shuttles, one in 1989 and another in 1990, each carrying a space probe utilizing what scientists have called the most toxic substance in the universe: plutonium.
What will the Mars Observer space probe teach us about our planetary neighbor?
The 18 space probes featured on the album are not limited to NASA and JPL, but also include probes from the former Soviet Union, Europe and Japan.
Since then, people have been to the moon and back, sent space probes to Mars and Saturn, and constructed an international space station.
She tells how the development of space probes led to the mapping of Mars and Venus.
Other objects described include comets and asteroids, the orbiting telescopes Hubble and Spitzer, and space probes such as the Mars landers, viking, and Pathfinder.
Space probes throughout the solar system detected these gusts in the solar wind (SN: 6/5/04, p.
Even so, Wolverton identifies the dozen or so Pioneer space probes as some of the most important engines of knowledge that were ever sent into space.
Paterson and Brandt provide detailed and provocative explanations of each of the images, which they blend into a portrait of how the universe works, The authors also explain how various telescopes and space probes gather astronomical information.
So far, none of scientists' many measurements of gamma, using telescope observations and space probes, has deviated from Einstein's predictions.

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