soybean

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Related to Soybean proteins: Soy protein, Soya protein

soy·bean

(soy'bēn),
The bean of the climbing herb Glycine soja or G. hispida (family Leguminosae); a bean rich in protein and containing little starch; it is the source of soybean oil; soybean flour is used in preparing a bread for diabetic patients, in feeding formulas for infants who are unable to tolerate cow's milk, and for adults allergic to cow's milk.
Synonym(s): soja, soya
[Hind. soyā, fennel]

soya bean

An edible high-protein legume (Glycine max), which is used to produce a wide range of food products.

soy·bean

(soy'bēn)
The bean of the climbing herb Glycine soja or G. hispida; rich in protein and containing little starch; used in preparing a bread for diabetic patients, in feeding formulas for infants who are unable to tolerate cow's milk, and for adults allergic to cow's milk.
[Hind. soyā, fennel]
References in periodicals archive ?
FTIR Analysis of Soybean Protein. Infrared spectra were obtained using a WQF-520 infrared spectroscope (Beijing Beifen-Ruili Analytical Instrument Co., Ltd., Beijing, China).
A new process for the preparation of soybean protein concentrate with hexaneaqueous ethanol mixed solvents.
Ahmad, "Preparation of soluble soybean protein aggregates (SSPA) from insoluble soybean protein concentrates (SPC) and its functional properties," Food Research International, vol.
Since commercially grown soybean do not accumulate sufficient methionine and cysteine to meet the needs of growing swine and poultry, researchers are attempting to increase the amounts of these amino acids in soybean protein. Approaches taken to improve protein quality can be grouped into five categories: (i) utilization of traditional plant breeding methods; (ii) expression of sulfur rich heterologous seed proteins; (iii) modification of abundant endogenous proteins; (iv) enhancing the accumulation of low abundance endogenous methionine rich proteins; and (v) expression of synthetic proteins with well-balanced amino acid composition.
Soybean protein hydrolysates have been studied for promoting proliferation of human keratinocytes in serum-free media to find an alternative for bovine pituitary extract (BPE) [7].
The purpose of this study was to analyze SPI structural changes following heating and the effect on surface hydrophobicity to evaluate the relationship between changes in secondary structure and the surface hydrophobicity of SPI which is helpful to give a new perspective to the elucidation of soybean protein functionality.
The hydrolysis of soybean protein with protease is a proprietary process that depresses trypsin inhibitor and urease, and increases the proportions of small peptides, water soluble protein and organic acids (Table 2).
Use of sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to measure degradation of soluble soybean proteins by Prevotella ruminicola GA33 or mixed urinal microbes in vitro.
An aliquot of 250 mL of assay buffer (5 mM Tris-HCL; 5 mM Trizma base; 0.5 M NaCl, 0.5% [v/v] Tween-20) was added to each well, and the plates were incubated at room temperature for 1 h to permit binding of soybean proteins to the wells.
(1994) reported that processed soybean proteins, such as isolated or concentrated soybean protein, were utilized almost as well as milk protein in 21 to 35 day-old pigs.
Differences in functional properties of 7S and 11S soybean proteins. J.