sound wave

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sound wave

A vibration of a vibrating medium that, on stimulating sensory receptors of the cochlea, is capable of giving rise to a sensation of sound. In dry air, the velocity is 1087 ft (331.6 m)/sec at 0°C; in water, it is approx. four times faster than in air.
See also: wave
References in periodicals archive ?
It has long been believed that sound waves do not carry a net mass of their own, but instead are transferred through solids, liquids or air by displacing matter locally, Penco explained.
Application of Sound Waves to Plants: Different environmental factors like temperature, light, wind, etc.
This neighbor said there was no other reason for this except the sound waves. So Al experimented with more neighbors, and some felt even more energized.'
Each of the spirals slows sound waves by a specific amount, so organising them in a group can bend the shape of in incoming wave of sound.
You can't hear these sound waves, but when they bounce off different parts of the body, they create "echoes" that are picked up by the probe and turned into a moving image.
The opposing forces set particles and photons into motion in the form of sound waves. The end of inflation is similar to the popping of a balloon: the balloon's surface enforces a pressure difference, but once it breaks, the air inside expands and creates a sound wave that travels spherically outward.
The research -- published in Applied Physics Letters -- has shown that certain types of sound waves can move data quickly, using minimal power.
Researchers from Bristol and Sussex Universities have built a working tractor beam by using high-amplitude sound waves to generate an 'acoustic hologram' to pick up and move small objects.
A collection of 64 mini loudspeakers creates columns of dense sound waves.
The rods are sized and spaced to interfere with sound waves and confine the waves to the material's edge.
But a pioneering device containing a microchip uses sound waves to spot the difference between tumour cells and white blood cells.
But a pioneering device uses sound waves to spot the difference between tumour cells and white blood cells.