sorbitol

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sorbitol

 [sor´bĭ-tol]
a six-carbon sugar alcohol from a variety of fruits, found in lens deposits in diabetes mellitus. A pharmaceutical preparation is used as a sweetening agent and osmotic laxative, and in drugs as a tablet excipient, moistening agent, and stabilizer.

sor·bi·tol

(sōr'bi-tol),
A reduction product of glucose and sorbose found in the berries of the rowan/mountain ash, Sorbus aucuparia (family Rosaceae), and in many fruits and seaweeds. It has many industrial and pharmaceutical uses; medicinally, it is used as a laxative and as a sweetening agent, and is almost completely metabolized (to CO2 and H2O); accumulates in Type 1 diabetes mellitus; elevated levels can cause osmotic damage.
Synonym(s): sorbite

sorbitol

(sôr′bĭ-tôl′, -tōl′, -tŏl′)
n.
A white, sweetish, crystalline alcohol, C6H8(OH)6, found in various berries and fruits or prepared synthetically and used as a flavoring agent, a sugar substitute for people with diabetes, and a moisturizer in cosmetics and other products.

sorbitol

A polyhydroxyl alcohol or polyol synthesized from glucose by aldose reductase in neural tissue, produced in excess in DM; sorbitol may be further metabolized to fructose, which together cause ↑ osmotic pressure, intracellular edema, Schwann cell swelling, anoxia and nerve demyelination; it has been implicated in diabetic neuropathy; it has been used as an artificial sweetener. Cf Advanced glycosylation endproducts.

sor·bi·tol

(sōr'bi-tol)
Reduction product in many fruits and seaweeds that has many industrial and pharmaceutical uses; used as a laxative and as a sweetening agent.

sorbitol

A sweetening agent derived from glucose.

sor·bi·tol

(sōr'bi-tol)
Reduction product of glucose and sorbose found in the berries of rowan/mountain ash, Sorbus aucuparia, and in many other fruits and seaweeds. Has many industrial and pharmaceutical uses.
References in periodicals archive ?
By means of two half-coil inductors powered by one generator for each wheelset, one for each wheel, the wheels are processed by multi-pulse heating, chilling and cooling in the same way as in the well-known method, which enables to get the structure of sorbitic pearlite or sorbite of 290+320 HB hardness in an agreeable depth from the roll surface evenly distributed along the length of the profile.
Microstructure of steel after heat treatment for hardness (HB 269-255) represents tempering sorbite (Figure 4) that stipulates high values of toughness and plastic properties of the steel.
2, is observed in annealed carbon and alloy structural steels with the structure of ferrite, ferrite-pearlite and finely dispersed sorbite. In high-alloy corrosion-resistant (stainless), high-temperature (strength), nonmagnetic and other steels and alloys more complex picture is observed.
In the annealed state, the structure was formed of polyhedral grains of ferrite and pearlite in approximately equal quantities, and in the case of the hardened state the structure consisted of globular sorbite.
Presence of all structures of disintegration austenite (pearlite, sorbite, troostite and martensite) in the changed structural condition speaks that this disintegration was preceded with the certain temperature of heating and the speed of cooling caused transformation pearlite in austenite, and then return process of transition of the last in pearlite.