solifluction


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solifluction

a slow movement of soil or rock debris down an incline, usually as a result of lubrication by its water content.
References in periodicals archive ?
Clear evidence of climate-driven modifications of landforms, such as patterned ground or solifluction lobes, would, no doubt, require a much longer period of monitoring.
After their interpretations a solifluction of Loess and Wilde river gravel material took place in the middle Late Pleistocene warm period (Figure 2).
Klimaszewski, M.: 1971, The effect of solifluction processes on the formation of mountain slopes in the Beskidy (Flysch Carpathians), Folia Quaternaria, 38, 3-18.
In the alpine area of the Southern Carpathians, the alpine geomorphological landscape is dominated by glacial landforms (glacial cirques, throughs, moraines, erratics and roches moutone) and periglacial features (rockglaciers, talus cones and scree slopes, block fields, rock streams, cryoplanation terraces, patterned ground, solifluction forms etc.).
These move downhill for hundreds of metres in response to seasonal freeze-thaw cycles (solifluction or altiplanation) and commonly result in a gradual transport of the larger fragments from the bottom of the thawed layer to the top.
4) whereby mounding rates often exceed estimates of solution and weathering, soil creep and solifluction and slope wash as summarised by Young and Saunders (1986).
No evidence of solifluction was observed on the slopes around sites 3 and 4.
Generally it is supposed that possible movements may be caused by the activity of water with frost or solifluction.
Clearly, geological erosion may be much more active in some locations for a variety of reasons, among them orogenic folding (mountain formation by the folding of Earth's crust), cyclones, solifluction (soil flow), lava flows, mudslides, and prolonged torrential rains.
Radiocarbon dating evidence for the initiation of solifluction ca.
A likely explanation for this increased erosion is reduced soil stability caused by an opening up of the vegetation cover (due mainly to a decline in spruce), possibly in combination with renewed freeze-thaw processes such as solifluction; there is evidence from mainland Nova Scotia (Stea and Mott 1989) and possibly New Brunswick (Lamothe, unpublished data) for renewed glaciation during the Younger Dryas.
"Want to go see the solifluction lobes?" I know my friends' response would be less than enthusiastic.