pedogenesis

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Related to Soil formation: Soil horizons

pe·do·gen·e·sis

(pē'dō-jen'ĕ-sis),
Permanent larval stage with sexual development, as in certain gall midges (genus Miastor). Compare: neoteny.
[G. pais (paid-), child, + genesis, origin]

pedogenesis

(pē′dō-jĕn′ĭ-sĭs)
n.

pe′do·ge·net′ic (-jə-nĕt′ĭk) adj.

pedogenesis

[pē′dōjen′əsis]
Etymology: Gk, pais, child, genesis, origin
the production of offspring by young or larval forms of animals, often by parthenogenesis, as in certain amphibians. Also spelled paedogenesis. -pedogenetic, adj.

pedogenesis

see PAEDOGENESIS.

pedogenesis

metamorphotic phenomenon of production of a number of separate individuals in an intermediate host, e.g. a snail, by a single larval form.
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References in periodicals archive ?
4) Fully time-transgressive without overlap: soil formation started and ended at different times, the soils never coexisted at the surface at any time.
Jenny H (1941) 'Factors of soil formation, a system of quantitative pedology.
Once a soil is buried, and away from the influence of weathering at the interface with the atmosphere, soil formation ends.
Nevertheless, calculation of both long- and short-term soil formation rates is necessary in order to assess the change of soil characteristics as a whole.
Effect of soil macrofauna on other soil biota and soil formation in reclaimed and unreclaimed post mining sites: Results of a field microcosm experiment.
There are Neolithic artefacts, but some, certainly, relate to pre-earthwork activity, and the dates and soil formation evidence are equivocai.
Soil formation has been interpreted as a permanent and sophisticated complex of interactions between organic and mineral substances, solar radiation, moisture and gases, living beings and the inanimate environment in space and time since V.
The author provides an overview of soil formation before and after life on Earth began.
This soil formation is one of most active soil types found in the United States, and it runs from the Red River to San Antonio.
Areas of prairie were most common on soils of the Jackson Group and the neighboring Cockfield soil formation (Table 2).
The interactions between the mineral constituents of detritus and organic matter of plant origin are currently observable, which allows to ascertain and study changes in pure detritus as well as the trends and character of modern soil formation.
The rate of soil loss can be many times higher than that of soil formation.