soft tissue sarcoma

(redirected from Soft tissue neoplasms)

soft tissue sarcoma

Oncology A sarcoma that arises in muscle, fat, fibrous tissue, blood vessels, or other supporting tissues. See Sarcoma.
Soft tissue sarcoma staging
I A Tumor cells are morphologically similar to normal cells; tumor measures ≤ 5 cm
 B Ditto; tumor ≥ 5 cm
II A Tumor cells are mildly atypical; tumor measures ≤ 5 cm
 B Ditto; tumor ≥ 5 cm
III A Tumor cells are moderately or severely atypical/bizarre; tumor measures ≤ 5 cm
 B Ditto; tumor ≥ 5 cm
IV A Any cellular atypia; any sized tumor with lymph node involvement
 B Any cellular atypia; any sized tumor with metastasis  
References in periodicals archive ?
(8-19) It is evident that molecular testing has acquired an increasingly important role in the diagnosis of soft tissue neoplasms.
Their topics include benign melanocytic proliferations and precursor lesions to melanoma, histologic and phenotypic variants of melanoma and of the borderline melanocytic tumor, squamous cell carcinoma and its precursors, benign adnexal neoplasms, soft tissue neoplasms of the skin and superficial subcutis, and medico-legal aspects of neoplastic dermatology.
Liposarcomas are malignant soft tissue neoplasms that can show adipocytic differentiation and represent up to 50 percent of the estimated 15,000 soft tissue sarcomas diagnosed each year in the United States.
(1,22) Lesions involving the soft tissues of the hand and fingers account for 15% of all benign and 4% of all malignant soft tissue neoplasms. (1,23,24) MRI can be a useful adjunct for radiographs in the hand and fingers given its ability to accurately delineate and differentiate tissue characteristics.
Lipoma is a benign neoplasm of adipose cells and constitutes 16% of all the soft tissue neoplasms.1 It is mesenchymal in origin and rarely found in deep areas.
Neural tumors represent a small but important part of the cutaneous soft tissue neoplasms. [1]
This might in part be due to the increasing use of ancillary molecular and molecular cytogenetic testing, which has become commonplace in the diagnosis of soft tissue neoplasms since the previous study of 2005.
Wakely and Kneisl observed 100% sensitivity and 97% specificity in STT diagnosis with FNAC and concluded that aspiration cytopathology of soft tissue mass lesions using FNA biopsy can be an accurate and minimally invasive method for the initial pathologic diagnosis of primary benign and malignant soft tissue masses, for the pathologic confirmation of metastatic tumors to soft tissue and for the documentation of locally recurrent soft tissue neoplasms [10].
Application of Immunohistochemistry to Soft Tissue Neoplasms. Arch Pathol Lab Med 2008;132:476-89.
Glomus tumors are soft tissue neoplasms that mostly affect younger adults.
Role of electron microscopy in the evaluation of soft tissue neoplasms, with emphasis on spindle cell and pleomorphic tumors.
They detail the principles and practice of biopsy diagnosis and management of these lesions, ancillary techniques for the evaluation and diagnosis of bone and soft tissue neoplasms, spindle cell tumors in children and adults, giant cell tumors, myxoid lesions, lipomatous tumors, vascular tumors, pleomorphic sarcomas, osseous tumors, cartilaginous neoplasms, small round cell neoplasms, epithelioid and polygonal cell tumors, and cystic lesions, and their clinical, cytologic and histologic, and radiographic features and differential diagnosis, with clinical vignettes.