soft drink

(redirected from Soft drinks)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to Soft drinks: List of soft drinks
A generic term for a carbonated beverage—commonly called ‘soda’ or ‘pop’—either artificially sweetened with saccharin or aspartame—average < 5 calories—or glucose, fructose—average 170 calories—purchased in cans or bottles or served from a tap
Adverse effects on health—peer-reviewed data: Carbonation is associated with dental erosion, osteoporosis, increased risk of fractures, and kidney stones; the sweeteners are linked to obesity and increased risk of type 2 diabetes

soft drink

A nonalcoholic beverage, typically carbonated and sweetened.
References in periodicals archive ?
It outlines consumer motivations for purchasing adult soft drinks and key innovation trends in adult soft drinks along three pillars - formulation, positioning, and packaging.
USPRwire, Fri Apr 08 2016] Soft drink refers to beverage with alcohol content lower than 0.
Consumption of soft drinks during orthodontic treatment puts teeth at risk of decay due to the acid attack on enamel," says Dr.
Carbonated Soft Drinks in the Netherlands - a Snapshot (2013)
Khawaja said that domestically made liquids like lemon soda, milk soda and other homemade drinks are more efficient as compared to the energy and soft drinks.
The Calpis acquisition would allow Asahi Soft Drinks to obtain Calpis' strong brand power in the lactic acid bacteria beverage area, the sources said.
Washington, Feb 8 ( ANI ): High level of soft drink consumption may make a person more vulnerable to asthma and, or, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a new study has revealed.
There is indirect evidence to suggest that sugar sweetened and artificially sweetened soft drinks might affect the term delivery because both high blood glucose concentrations and low dose methanol exposure have been linked to a shorter duration of gestation.
Over the past 16 years, the amount of sugar in American diets has increased by 28 percent, with about a third of it coming from soft drinks.
While the new rules might please some health advocates, others argue that soft drinks should be banned entirely from schools, including high schools.
And many communities, from New York City to New Jersey to Los Angeles, have ejected soft drinks from elementary schools, many middle schools, and some high schools.