soft drink

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A generic term for a carbonated beverage—commonly called ‘soda’ or ‘pop’—either artificially sweetened with saccharin or aspartame—average < 5 calories—or glucose, fructose—average 170 calories—purchased in cans or bottles or served from a tap
Adverse effects on health—peer-reviewed data: Carbonation is associated with dental erosion, osteoporosis, increased risk of fractures, and kidney stones; the sweeteners are linked to obesity and increased risk of type 2 diabetes

soft drink

A nonalcoholic beverage, typically carbonated and sweetened.
References in periodicals archive ?
Stevia has helped many beverage makers reduce calories in their soft drinks, driving manufacturers to consider its use.
The Global Soft Drinks Packaging Market is projected to witness a CAGR of 4.
Khawaja said that domestically made liquids like lemon soda, milk soda and other homemade drinks are more efficient as compared to the energy and soft drinks.
The Calpis acquisition would allow Asahi Soft Drinks to obtain Calpis' strong brand power in the lactic acid bacteria beverage area, the sources said.
The Soft Drinks Report showed that the total soft drinks market had grown 1% by volume year-on-year, with raw materials driving a 7% value hike.
Washington, Feb 8 ( ANI ): High level of soft drink consumption may make a person more vulnerable to asthma and, or, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a new study has revealed.
Over the past 16 years, the amount of sugar in American diets has increased by 28 percent, with about a third of it coming from soft drinks.
The industry already has a general practice of not selling carbonated soft drinks to students in elementary schools, although the new proposal would make it more official and consistent.
Soft drinks provide about 7 percent of the average American's calories and 9 percent of teens' calories.
We have evidence that drinking sweetened soft drinks will lead to an increased risk of obesity.
Banning soft drinks in schools will do absolutely nothing to help the obesity problem,'' said Sean McBride, spokesman for the National Soft Drinks Association.
The advertising has obviously worked, but we might experience more health problems as a result of the amount of soft drinks we drink.