x-ray

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x-ray

(eks'rā),
1. The ionizing electromagnetic radiation emitted from a highly evacuated tube, resulting from the excitation of the inner orbital electrons by the bombardment of the target anode with a stream of electrons from a heated cathode. Synonym(s): roentgen ray Compare: glass rays, indirect rays.
2. Ionizing electromagnetic radiation produced by the excitation of the inner orbital electrons of an atom by other processes, such as nuclear delay and its sequelae.
3. Synonym(s): radiograph
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

x-ray

or

X-ray

(ĕks′rā′)
n. or x ray or X ray
1.
a. A photon of electromagnetic radiation of very short wavelength, ranging from about 10 down to 0.01 nanometers, and very high energy, ranging from about 100 up to 100,000 electron volts.
b. often x-rays or X-rays A narrow beam of such photons. X-rays are used for their penetrating power in radiography, radiology, radiotherapy, and scientific research. Also called roentgen ray.
2.
a. A photograph taken with x-rays.
b. The act or process of taking such a photograph: Did the patient move during the x-ray?
tr.v. x-rayed, x-raying, x-rays or X-rayed or X-raying or X-rays
1. To irradiate with x-rays.
2. To photograph with x-rays.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

X-ray

High-energy radiation A range of the electromagnetic spectrum used in low doses to diagnose disease and in high doses to treat CA. See Soft X-rays.
X-ray exposure
Diagnostic x-rays Impart 30-150 keV of energy; rare reports vaguely suggest a relationship between exposure to low- level X-rays and a slight ↑ in myeloproliferative disorders and a minimal ↑ risk for developing myeloma
Therapeutic x-rays
• Low level radiation, eg 5-10 keV or 'grenz' radiation–may be used to treat recalcitrant skin conditions–eg, psoriasis
• High level radiation, eg megaelectron-volt–MeV) radiation–may be used to treat internal malignancy
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

x-ray

()
1. The ionizing electromagnetic radiation emitted from a highly evacuated tube, resulting from the excitation of the inner orbital electrons by the bombardment of the target anode with a stream of electrons from a heated cathode.
2. Ionizing electromagnetic radiation produced by the excitation of the inner orbital electrons of an atom by other processes, such as nuclear delay and its sequelae.
3. A radiograph.
Synonym(s): roentgen ray.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

X-ray

A form of electromagnetic radiation produced when a beam of high-speed electrons, accelerated by a high voltage, strikes a metal, such as copper or tungsten. X-radiation penetrates matter to a degree depending on the voltage used to produce it and the density of the matter. It acts on normal photographic film in much the same way as does visible light, but can also produce an image on a fluorescing screen. These properties make X-radiation valuable in medical diagnosis. X-rays are damaging to tissue, especially rapidly reproducing tissues, and can be used to treat various cancers (see RADIOTHERAPY).
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

X-ray

an ionizing radiation that is a powerful MUTAGEN with wavelengths between 10–1 and 10 nm on the ELECTROMAGNETIC SPECTRUM. X-rays are produced by bombarding a metallic target with fast electrons in a vacuum, and are capable of penetrating various thicknesses of solids. Having passed through a solid they can act on a photographic plate producing a light/shade pattern indicative of the solid structure.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Roentgen,

Wilhelm K., German physicist and Nobel laureate, 1845-1923.
roentgen - the international unit of exposure dose for x-rays or gamma rays.
roentgen ray - Synonym(s): x-ray
roentgenograph - Synonym(s): radiograph
Medical Eponyms © Farlex 2012

x-ray

()
1. Ionizing electromagnetic radiation emitted from a highly evacuated tube, resulting from excitation of inner orbital electrons by bombardment of the target anode with a stream of electrons from a heated cathode.
2. Ionizing electromagnetic radiation produced by the excitation of the inner orbital electrons of an atom by other processes, such as nuclear delay and its sequelae.
3. Synonym(s): radiograph.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
This consideration shows that even a relatively high-speed observed soft X-ray jet cannot become unstable--the reason for that in this case is the low density of the jet's plasma.
Before ASCA, the Einstein (U.S.A.) and ROSAT (Germany) observatories, launched in 1978 and 1990, respectively, were also equipped with X-ray imaging mirrors, but they were only sensitive to soft X-rays below 2-3 keV.
Panek, "Detection of soft X-rays with the pixel detector timepix operated as a highly sensitive dark-current free CCD-like camera," in Proceedings of the IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference (NSS/MIC '11), IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record/18th International Workshop on RoomTemperature Semiconductor X-Ray and GammaRay Detectors, pp.
Hitomi carries three other powerful instruments: the Soft X-Ray Imager, the Hard X-Ray Imager, and the Soft Gamma Detector.
Steve Snowden, an astrophysicist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, said that interactions between the solar wind and neutral atoms in comets, the outer atmospheres of planets, and even interstellar gas produces soft X-rays.
The emission produced by secretion onto supermassive black holes in AGN dominates the overall emission of the universe over almost all of the electromagnetic spectrum, particularly the far UV and soft x-ray regions where the power from most AGN peaks.
The mass absorption coefficients of tungsten and tantalum were measured with soft x-ray photons from 1450 eV to 2350 eV using an undulator source.
Rosen is recognized internationally for major contributions to the development of laboratory soft X-ray lasers, and to the design and analysis of complex high energy density and ICF target physics experiments, elucidating electron and radiation transport, and the properties of hot dense matter.
"This hypothesis is consistent with the absence so far of soft X-ray emission from the region," they note.