Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology


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Related to Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology: Center for Disease Control

Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology

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SART

An affiliate of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine consisting of clinics and programs that provide assisted reproductive technology. SART reports annual fertility clinic data to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Laufer, "Births in Israel Resulting from In-Vitro Fertilization/Embryo Transfer, 1982-1989: National Registry of the Israeli Association for Fertility Research," Human Reproduction 7 (1992): 1159-63; Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology, American Society for Reproductive Medicine, Assisted Reproductive Technology in the United States and Canada, "1993 Results Generated from the American Society for Reproductive Medicine/Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Registry," Fertility and Sterility 64 (1995): 13-21.
In November 2009, the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) and the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) issued new guidelines limiting the number of embryos that should be transferred in one IVF cycle.
Guidelines of the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) and the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) call for consideration of transfer of a single embryo in women under 35 with a favorable prognosis.
In the wake of news that the octuplets born recently in California to single mother Nadya Suleman were conceived through in vitro fertilization, the center has called on the American Society for Reproductive Medicine and its affiliated organization, the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology, to revoke the membership of the fertility specialist who performed the in vitro procedure.
The Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology recently posted 2006 outcome data from its member clinics.
The guidelines of the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology and the American Society for Reproductive Medicine are age based, and are meant to help determine the appropriate number of cleavage-stage embryos to transfer.
The American Society for Assisted Reproductive Medicine and the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology have developed updated recommendations on the number of embryos per transfer to reduce the risk of multiple gestation.
Davis, M.D., immediate past president of the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology, noted that "in 2001, women less than 35 years of age underwent approximately 47% of the IVF cycles in the United States, and 75% of the cycles were first or second attempts.
Surrey, M.D., president of the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART).
The average live singleton birth per transfer rate reported to the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology in 2001 for women aged younger than 35 years was 24.8%.
Owen Davis, president of the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology, an ASRM-affiliated society.

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