social

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social

 [so´shal]
pertaining to societies or other groups of people.
social anxiety disorder social phobia.
social breakdown syndrome deterioration of social and interpersonal skills, work habits, and behavior seen in chronically hospitalized psychiatric patients. Symptoms are due to the effects of long term hospitalization rather than the primary illness, and include excessive passivity, assumption of the chronic sick role, withdrawal, and apathy. Such effects are also seen in long term inmates of prisons or concentration camps. Called also institutionalism.
social worker a professional trained in the treatment of psychosocial problems of patients and their families. Family social workers practice social case work. Psychiatric social workers practice various forms of counseling and group or individual psychotherapy. Most social workers have a master's degree in social work (M.S.W.). There are also bachelor's (B.S.W.) and doctoral (D.S.W.) degrees in social work.

social

(sō′shəl)
adj.
1.
a. Of or relating to human society and its modes of organization: social classes; social problems; a social issue.
b. Of or relating to rank and status in society: social standing.
c. Of, relating to, or occupied with matters affecting human welfare: social programs.
2.
a. Interacting with other people and living in communities: Humans are social creatures.
b. Biology Living together in organized groups or similar close aggregates: Ants are social insects.

so′cial·ly adv.

Patient discussion about social

Q. how to treat my social phobia?

A. there is a protocol for treating any kinds of phobias. it requires time and a psychologist. it's consisted of learning relaxation methods and doing everything in small steps until you can handle your phobia.

Q. Social Anxiety I have found myself wondering more and more about social anxiety. My partner seemed to develop social anxiety around the same time she was diagnosed bipolar. i am wondering how many of you also suffer from soical anxiety and if you feel it is a result of bipolar disorder (perhaps personal knowledge of the possible behaviours associated with the illness) or if it is a seperate and unrelated symptom?

A. hi,
social anxiety disorder is best defeated by groups like
the Toastmasters International or the dale carnegie course.
The nwork without drugs
David

Q. I am a social drinker and not an alcoholic. I am a social drinker and not an alcoholic. I had mild drink while being in college. I drink occasionally but get hit by these symptoms. Last night I only had rum & coke and a bottle of cider, and today I'm ill again. I mean, I know people get hangovers, but it seems like alcohol has a dramatic effect on my immune system.

A. Everyones system is different--YOUR body is telling you something?--maybe you shouldnt drink any more?----mrfoot56

More discussions about social
References in periodicals archive ?
"Objects, Texts, and Practices: The Refrigerator in Consumer Discourses between the Wars." In The Socialness of Things: Essays on the Semiotics of Objects, edited by Stephen Harold Riggins, pp.
More accurately, human beings may be hardwired to be social, and socialness requires the specification of the culture's ethical rules.
In the engineering disciplines, curiously enough, technical implements are routinely ascribed genuine socialness, even if it tends to be extremely diluted.
Appropriately dedicated to Paul Bouissac, the well-known University of Toronto (Victoria College) semiotician, this volume acknowledges his recognition of "the theoretical potential of the socialness of things" (p.
For an alternative narrative of community Havel turns, not surprisingly, to theater as an example of "genuine socialness," which occurs "the moment [actors, crew, and audience] cease to be a mere group of people and their mutual presence becomes mutual participation" (Letters 250).
In the success theater of social media, heightened socialness (together with increasing connectedness) breeds what is termed microcelebrity, or the treatment of audience as "fan base" (Marwick & boyd, 2011; Senft, 2013).
The Socialness of Things: Essays in the Socio- Semiotics of Objects.

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