stigmatize

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stigmatize

(stĭg′mə-tīz′)
tr.v. stigma·tized, stigma·tizing, stigma·tizes
1. To characterize or brand as disgraceful or ignominious.
2. To mark with stigmata or a stigma.
3. To cause stigmata to appear on.

stig′ma·ti·za′tion (-tĭ-zā′shən) n.
stig′ma·tiz′er n.
References in periodicals archive ?
Muscat: More people are coming forward to be tested for the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) in Oman, thanks to a long-running government campaign to eliminate the social stigma around the condition.
It has shifted the sense of responsibility once to be owned by the parents to the state machinery and thus the cultural traits of self-respect, egoistic considerations and social stigma associated to this breaking has been completely struck with enlighten.
That is why we need to continue to dispel social stigmas and encourage as many people as possible from all over the emirate to take advantage of the free screenings we are offering.
Through a preliminary study examining HIV testing access and health-based decisionmaking in urban, transgender populations, Juarez found that social stigma, as well as a lack of affordability, keep many transgender people from pursuing needed care.
The social stigma associated with head lice continues to be perceived as a major barrier to reducing its spread.
They should not care about the social stigma attached with some professions.
SHAKESPEARE may be partly to blame for the social stigma associated with disfiguring skin conditions, say experts.
But even though so many people are affected, there is still a strong social stigma attached to mental ill health, and people can experience discrimination in many aspects of their lives.
Depicting the fragile relationship between a 40-year-old femme and a 19-year-old lad, and how they hold on to each other despite a severe social stigma, Ahn taps into a wellspring of emotions with a fine eye and an exquisitely feminine sensibility.
Apart from being infectious and potentially fatal, HIV/AIDS is also associated with social stigma. Hence, the infection with Human Immuno-deficiency Virus (HIV) and the subsequent development of Acquired Immuno-deficiency syndrome (AIDS) are often associated with various psychological problems.
Back in the 1950s and 60s there was a social stigma for an unmarried woman to fall pregnant.
Self-stigma and attitudes toward counseling had positive effects on their WTP, whereas the year in college and social stigma had negative effects.