discrimination

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Related to Social prejudice: Social discrimination

discrimination

 [dis-krim″ĭ-na´shun]
1. the making of fine distinctions.
2. actions based on preconceived opinions without consideration of facts.
right-left discrimination the ability to differentiate one side of the body from the other.

dis·crim·i·na·tion

(dis'krim-i-nā'shŭn),
In conditioning, responding differentially, as when an organism makes one response to a reinforced stimulus and a different response to an unreinforced stimulus.
[L. discrimino, pp. -atus, to separate]

discrimination

/dis·crim·i·na·tion/ (-krim″ĭ-na´shun) the making of a fine distinction.

discrimination

[diskrim′inā′shən]
Etymology: L, discrimen, division
the act of distinguishing or differentiating. The ability to distinguish between touch or pressure at two nearby points on the body is known as two-point discrimination.

discrimination

The cognitive and sensory capacity or ability to see fine distinctions and perceive differences between objects, subjects, concepts and patterns, or possess exceptional development of the senses.

In health and social care, discrimination may relate to a conscious decision to treat a person or group differently and to deny them access to treatment or care to which they have a right.

dis·crim·i·na·tion

(dis-krim'i-nā'shŭn)
1. The act of distinguishing between different things; ability to perceive different things as different, or to respond to them differently.
2. psychology Responding differently, as when the subject responds in one way to a reinforced stimulus and in another to an unreinforced stimulus.
3. Acting differently toward some people on the basis of the social class or category to which they belong rather than their individual qualities.
[L. discrimino, pp. -atus, to separate]

dis·crim·i·na·tion

(dis-krim'i-nā'shŭn)
In conditioning, responding differentially, as when an organism makes one response to a reinforced stimulus and a different response to an unreinforced stimulus.
[L. discrimino, pp. -atus, to separate]
References in periodicals archive ?
The study makes virtually no mention of the large body of theory on racism and other forms of social prejudice that has formed such a central topic of post-colonial studies and critical race theory in the last dozen or so years.
July 13 /PRNewswire/ -- In opposition to a common social prejudice that assumes toddlers are not capable of learning how to use a potty chair in a day, veteran home educator Carrie Franzwa has issued a public potty training challenge and fundraiser to set the record straight.
Investments being made in Health Sector are focused in backward areas or among people who have no access to health care due to difficult geographical terrain or social prejudice such as SC, ST, OBC and minorities.
Moreover, social prejudice against them never quite disappeared, regardless of economic and political clout.
However, many women are unaware of their rights, and thus, unknowingly accept social prejudices.
In India, however, sexual violence against women by the armed forces exhibits another alarming tendency: Over the years, and especially in Kashmir and the northeast, this violence has been ethnicized and communalized, reflecting and consolidating prevailing social prejudices.
In an environment where social prejudices are revived and polarization is exacerbated, it is assumed that bribery and corruption charges will not be discussed and measures taken to hush up the allegations will be forgotten.
Forced heterosexual marriages, either by guilt or fear of social prejudices, often trample the rights and opinions of women as well, who often enter these marriages not knowing their partner is gay.
Osman's joker is a literary figure who "can comment on the king's law" and an entertainer who enacts our social prejudices by wearing blackface; "joker" is also legal jargon, meaning "a hidden clause in an otherwise transparent law" Osman's source lexicon is the 1912 Congressional hearings held to investigate the monopoly powers of the American Sugar Refining Company.
of Leeds, UK) fully explicates the complex case and uses it as a lens for an intriguing study of social prejudices, class, and discrimination (against immigrants and Jews) as well as the history of the furniture and antiques market in Britain.

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