discrimination

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Related to Social prejudice: Social discrimination

discrimination

 [dis-krim″ĭ-na´shun]
1. the making of fine distinctions.
2. actions based on preconceived opinions without consideration of facts.
right-left discrimination the ability to differentiate one side of the body from the other.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

dis·crim·i·na·tion

(dis'krim-i-nā'shŭn),
In conditioning, responding differentially, as when an organism makes one response to a reinforced stimulus and a different response to an unreinforced stimulus.
[L. discrimino, pp. -atus, to separate]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

discrimination

The cognitive and sensory capacity or ability to see fine distinctions and perceive differences between objects, subjects, concepts and patterns, or possess exceptional development of the senses.

In health and social care, discrimination may relate to a conscious decision to treat a person or group differently and to deny them access to treatment or care to which they have a right.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

dis·crim·i·na·tion

(dis-krim'i-nā'shŭn)
1. The act of distinguishing between different things; ability to perceive different things as different, or to respond to them differently.
2. psychology Responding differently, as when the subject responds in one way to a reinforced stimulus and in another to an unreinforced stimulus.
3. Acting differently toward some people on the basis of the social class or category to which they belong rather than their individual qualities.
[L. discrimino, pp. -atus, to separate]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

dis·crim·i·na·tion

(dis-krim'i-nā'shŭn)
In conditioning, responding differentially, as when an organism makes one response to a reinforced stimulus and a different response to an unreinforced stimulus.
[L. discrimino, pp. -atus, to separate]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
While Du Bois questioned the political impact of a novel that seemed to reinforce racist social prejudice, other readers, particularly younger African American artists, praised McKay's vivid depiction of the working-class "semi-underworld" of Harlem, agreeing with Langston Hughes that McKay's novel would become "the flower of the Negro Renaissance, even if it is no lovely lily" (1 Mar.
"And there is also the social prejudice against fat people which can adversely affect their school performance, job opportunities and even self-esteem."
So it is important forr socialists not to divorce the analysis of AIDS and the means to combat it from an understanding of various forms of social prejudice, which include xenopliobla, racism, anti-drug prejudice, and, in the United States at least, most of all homophobla.
The forms of social prejudice vary across the conservative spectrum.
Peter's mother works as a housekeeper, and they often have little to eat and face social prejudice. But Peter is intelligent, sometimes seeming to relate to his mother as a fellow adult, and earns a scholarship to a gymnasium, a prestigious education track.
The covered female athletes, who had not just struggled to raise their levels of achievement but also fought social prejudice to get a chance to participate in the games, received plenty of encouragement from the crowds as they competed in their respective disciplines.
The multitudes of factors that increase the difficulty of creating a sustainable planet are daunting, including human bias, greed and social prejudice, however, the book gives a hopeful scenario for changes that can be made.
While some Christians used 'Biblical grounds' to oppose homosexuality, said the Archbishop, it actually tended to be more about social prejudice and inherited ideas.
That we are in the process of re-evaluating our attitudes towards animals is clear, but in the name of consistency please let that be done according to precise ethical reasoning, and not simply through political or social prejudice.
Does this attitude not perpetuate social prejudice?
In Stanford's speech code, banned epithets reflect "a widely shared, deeply felt, and historically rooted social prejudice against people with that [derided] trait." Because the speaker of such epithets is expressing a "widely shared prejudice," he or she has ceased to speak as an individual or to express merely his or her own thoughts, and has become a living symptom and symbol of societal oppression.

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