social network

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social network

A group of individuals linked by behaviors (e.g., drug abuse), diseases (e.g., a cancer support group), hobbies or lifestyles (e.g., participation in sports or online friendships), family ties, or professions (e.g., nursing).
References in periodicals archive ?
As a result, social network theory states that ambiguity is not a source of concern or uncertainty and that it should be embraced as a way to solve problems [18][24].
While the theories originated from social network theory and the model of innovation dissemination, Chatman progressed the central concepts, applying them to marginalised populations in institutionalized settings.
Using Dunbar's social network theory as a guiding principle, researchers hypothesized that relational ministers would exceed Dunbar's number (Dunbar, 2008) and in so doing would report higher levels of burnout and lower levels of perceived ministry effectiveness.
Although the social network theory suggests that centrality, structural holes, and hierarchy influence productivity (Freeman, 1979; Burt, 1992), only statistical models can determine to what extent the independent variables explain this theoretical causality.
"Social network theory argues that the composition of one's social circle has real and measurable impacts on one's life," the paper explains.
In sum, the results show that the five most widely used theories are institutional theory, the resource-based view (RBV) of the firm, organizational learning theory, social network theory, and the knowledge-based view (KBV).
Our conceptual framework, social network theory, centers on how social capital operates (Adler & Kwon, 2002; Anheier, Gerhards, & Romo, 1995; Portes, 1998).
Proactive development of collaborative networks can be a managerial tool but requires an understanding of social network theory and an evolution of new metrics for measuring success.
In social network theory, the relationships, as much as the actors, are the constituent elements of the network.
Emergence theory offers a cogent explanation for how such cultures spread; social network theory explains why they are tenacious.
(i) We exploit landmark, a novel social-aware metric, to accurately predict node mobility on the basis of social network theory, such that mobility-assisted routing can benefit from it.

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